UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2022

 

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ___________ to ___________

 

Commission file number: 000-53029

 

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Colorado   26-1315585
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
     
6035 South Loop East, Houston, TX   77033
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (832) 649-5658

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol   Name of each exchange on which registered
N/A   N/A   N/A

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐ No

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐ No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
    Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

 

If securities are registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act, indicate by check mark whether the financial statements of the registrant included in the filing reflect the correction of an error to previously issued financial statements. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether any of those error corrections are restatements that required a recovery analysis of incentive-based compensation received by any of the registrant’s executive officers during the relevant recovery period pursuant to §240.10D-1(b). ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No  

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates based upon the closing price of $0.0115 per share of common stock as of June 30, 2022 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter), was $2,695,967.

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 447,704,272 shares of common stock are issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2023.

 

Documents Incorporated by Reference

 

None

 

 

 

 

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC.

FORM 10-K

December 31, 2022

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

        Page
    PART I   1
         
Item 1.   Business   1
Item 1A.   Risk Factors   5
Item 1B.   Unresolved Staff Comments   13
Item 2.   Properties   13
Item 3   Legal Proceedings   13
Item 4.   Mine Safety Disclosures   13
         
    PART II   14
         
Item 5.   Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities   14
Item 6.   [Reserved]   15
Item 7.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations   15
Item 7A.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk   27
Item 8.   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data   27
Item 9.   Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosures   27
Item 9A.   Controls and Procedures   27
Item 9B.   Other Information   28
Item 9C.   Disclosure Regarding Foreign Jurisdictions that Prevent Inspections   28
         
    PART III   29
         
Item 10.   Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance   29
Item 11.   Executive Compensation   31
Item 12.   Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters   37
Item 13.   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence   39
Item 14.   Principal Accountant Fees and Services   40
         
    PART IV   41
         
Item 15.   Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules   41
Item 16.   Form 10-K Summary   45
    Signatures   46

 

i

 

 

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Report”) contains forward-looking statements that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. All statements, other than statements of historical facts, contained in this Report, including statements regarding our strategy, future operations, future financial position, future revenue, projected costs, prospects, plans and objectives of management and expected market growth, are forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “could,” “will,” “would,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,”, “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “intend,” “predict,” “seek,” “contemplate,” “project,” “continue,” “potential,” “ongoing” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements about:

 

  our ability to obtain additional funds for our operations;

 

  our ability to obtain and maintain intellectual property protection for our products and our ability to operate our business without infringing the intellectual property rights of others;

 

  our reliance on third party distributors;

 

  the initiation, timing, progress and results of our research and development programs;

 

  our dependence on current and future collaborators for developing new products;

 

  the rate and degree of market acceptance of our commercial products;

 

  the implementation of our business model and strategic plans for our business;

 

  our estimates of our expenses, losses, future revenue and capital requirements, including our needs for additional financing;

 

  our reliance on third party suppliers to supply the materials and components for our products;

 

  our ability to attract and retain qualified key management and technical personnel;

 

  our financial performance;

 

  the impact of government regulation and developments relating to our competitors or our industry; and

 

  other risks and uncertainties, including those listed under the caption “Risk Factors.”

 

These statements relate to future events or our future operational or financial performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance, or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations include, among other things, those listed under the section titled “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Report.

 

Any forward-looking statement in this Report reflects our current view with respect to future events and is subject to these and other risks, uncertainties and assumptions relating to our business, results of operations, industry, and future growth. Given these uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. No forward-looking statement is a guarantee of future performance. You should read this Report completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from any future results expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Except as required by law, we assume no obligation to update or revise these forward-looking statements for any reason, even if new information becomes available in the future.

 

This Report also contains estimates, projections and other information concerning our industry, our business and the markets for certain glass strengthening solutions, hydrophobic products, and window film mounting solutions, including data regarding the estimated size of those markets and their projected growth rates. Information that is based on estimates, forecasts, projections, or similar methodologies is inherently subject to uncertainties and actual events or circumstances may differ materially from events and circumstances reflected in this information. Unless otherwise expressly stated, we obtained these industry, business, market and other data from reports, research surveys, studies and similar data prepared by third parties, industry, and general publications, government data and similar sources. In some cases, we do not expressly refer to the sources from which these data are derived.

 

You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Report. Except as required by law, we do not undertake any obligation to update or release any revisions to these forward-looking statements to reflect any events or circumstances, whether as a result of new information, future events, changes in assumptions or otherwise, after the date hereof.

 

ii

 

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes to the consolidated financial statements that appear elsewhere in this Report.

 

As used in this Report and unless otherwise indicated, the terms “C-Bond Systems, Inc.,” “Company,” “we,” “us,” or “our” refer to C-Bond Systems, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary, C-Bond Systems, LLC, and its 80% owned subsidiary, Mobile Tint, LLC, as the context may require.

 

Overview

 

We are a materials development company and sole owner, developer, and manufacturer of the patented C-Bond technology. We are engaged in the implementation of proprietary nanotechnology applications and processes to enhance properties of strength, functionality, and sustainability of brittle material systems. Our primary focus is in the multi-billion-dollar glass and window film industry with target markets in the United States and internationally. Additionally, we have expanded our product line to include disinfection products. We operate in two divisions: C-Bond Transportation Solutions and Patriot Glass Solutions. C-Bond Transportation Solutions sells a windshield strengthening, water repellent solution called C-Bond nanoShield™ as well as disinfection products. Patriot Glass Solutions sells multi-purpose glass strengthening primer and window film mounting solutions, including C-Bond BRS, a ballistic-resistant film system, and C-Bond Secure, a forced entry system.

 

On June 30, 2021, we entered into a Share Exchange Agreement and Plan of Reorganization (the “Exchange Agreement”) with (i) Mobile Tint LLC, a Texas limited liability company doing business as A1 Glass Coating (“Mobile”), (ii) the sole member of Mobile (the “Mobile Shareholder”), and (iii) Michael Wanke as the Representative of the Mobile Shareholder. Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, C-Bond agreed to acquire 80% of Mobile’s units, representing 80% of Mobile’s issued and outstanding capital stock (the “Mobile Shares”). On July 22, 2021, we closed the Exchange Agreement and acquired 80% of the Mobile Shares. Mobile provides quality window tint solutions for auto, home, and business owners across Texas, specializing in automotive window tinting, residential window film, and commercial window film that stop harmful UV rays from passing through its window films for reduced glare, comfortable temperatures, and lower energy bills. Mobile also carries products that offer forced-entry protection and films that protect glass from scratches, graffiti, other types of vandalism, and even bullets, including C-Bond BRS and C-Bond Secure products.

 

We expect that our recent acquisition of Mobile will be the springboard to provide glass security solutions across the United States. We recently launched Patriot Glass Solutions to protect personal and business property across the United States using C-Bond’s proprietary glass strengthening technology to protect property from looting, rioting, break-ins, and gunfire. With our recent acquisition of Mobile, we are re-branding our Safety Solutions Group as “Patriot Glass Solutions.” Patriot Glass Solutions’ primary products include C-Bond BRS, a ballistic-resistant film system; and C-Bond Secure, a multi-purpose glass strengthening primer and window film mounting solution that deters forced entry.

 

Our Business

 

Product and Service Offerings  

 

C-Bond’s core products are patented, low-cost technologies that significantly increase the mechanical performance of glass. We have implemented the following business structure integrating the Transportation Solutions Group and Patriot Glass Solutions.  

 

Transportation Solutions Group

 

C-Bond Transportation Windshield Performance Solution  

 

C-Bond nanoShield™ is a patented, nanotechnology, windshield glass strengthening and hydrophobic (water repellent) all-in-one performance system. It is designed to improve windshield safety and performance by increasing windshield chip and crack resistance and improving windshield visibility in wet weather conditions to provide extended driver reaction time.  We believe that C-Bond nanoShield is unique in the market and that the product has no direct competitors. With C-Bond nanoShield, we intend to create new markets and channels in the aftermarket automotive windshield segment, including fleets, automotive dealers, and service providers.

 

1

 

 

Disinfectant Products

 

On May 20, 2020, we entered into a two-year Distributor Agreement with an entity where we were appointed as a distributor to exclusively sell MB-10 Disinfectant Tablets for use in certain markets. In February 2022, we and the entity amended the Distributor Agreement to include the sale of Vimoba Tablets in those same markets and extended the term of the Distributor Agreement for another year. MB-10 Disinfectant Tablets are the most convenient way yet to deliver the benefits of chlorine dioxide to hygiene or biosafety programs. MB-10 disinfectant tablets have one of the broadest, most complete EPA registration labels on the market. It is a safe, easy, and effective way to disinfect a vehicle’s interior using an EPA registered disinfectant (Reg No.70060-19-46269) included on List N for use against human coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. It is proven effective against emerging viral pathogens, including enveloped and large and small non-enveloped viruses. MB-10 Tablets provide fast-acting virus and bacteria protection that is safe for all vehicle surfaces including LED screens and electronics without leaving a residue or odor. Vimoba Tablets are 100% non-corrosive, chlorine dioxide producing tablets that maintain the exact same efficacy, EPA Label claims, dilution rates and contact times as MB-10 Tablets, while including a buffering agent that makes the Vimoba solution completely non-corrosive on stainless steel – even after prolonged use or exposure – and even when the solution dries on the surface. We were appointed as a distributor to exclusively sell MB-10 Disinfectant Tablets and Vimoba Tablets for use in the following markets:

 

  Automotive, Trucking, RV, rental agencies (auto and truck), service vehicles (taxi, Uber, Lyft), mass transit (train, buses), golf carts, aviation, train, marine (potential future growth)
     
  Dealerships
     
  Global Distribution
     
  Service Providers
     
  Transportation Detailing.

 

Patriot Glass Solutions

 

C-Bond Secure Strengthening Primer and Window Film Mounting Solution

 

C-Bond Secure is a patented, non-toxic, water-based nanotechnology solution designed to significantly increase the strength of architectural glass and improve the performance properties of window film-to-glass products. C-Bond Secure improves the performance of window film-to-glass products by reducing glass breakage from impact and stress environments and filling the capillary voids on the glass surface to prevent the trapping of moisture and impurities that impede cure time and adhesion between the glass and any succeeding window film product. This is important because when glass does break, this nanotechnology improves the chances that no large shards/pieces will escape the immediate area of the glass surface and result in serious laceration or personal injury.  C-Bond Secure has been tested against untreated glass by third-party laboratories and shown to outperform untreated glass in this capacity.  C-Bond Secure faces market competition from basic soap and water products (such as baby shampoo and dishwashing soap) as the recognized industry standard window film application solutions, which we believe provide no structural benefits and are designed to wash hair and dishes, respectively. C-Bond Secure increases overall glass strength, improves window film product performance, and can be used in conjunction with any manufacturer’s film product.

 

C-Bond BRS (Ballistic-Resistant Film System)

 

C-Bond BRS is a patented, nanotechnology Ballistic-Resistant Film System that increases the structural integrity of glass and provides National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Level I, Level II, Level IIA, and Underwriter Laboratories (UL) 752 ballistic-resistant protection. C-Bond BRS includes a specified glass thickness and glass type, the C-Bond window film mounting solution to improve the glass mechanical strength, and the C-Bond window film product. This product is targeted to police, fire, emergency services, media outlets, schools, airports, and government buildings due to the utility of ballistic-resistant glass protection in their respective fields. The C-Bond BRS system seeks to combine simplicity and affordability with a one-way capability (the ability to shoot-out but prevent shooting in) ballistic protection compared to other costlier ballistic resistant material (polycarbonate and glass laminate) products.

 

Commercial Market Strategy

 

We utilize a distributor model to reach potential customers. This approach takes advantage of existing resources and facilitates relationships between us and our enterprise partners to leverage their collective strengths. We require industry partners to generate economic growth, support commercialization activities, provide more developed business networks, knowledge of and access to supply and demand channels, and supplement limited financial resources. We and our industrial partners work together to determine scalability, adaptability, affordability, usability and intellectual property. From a business perspective, the long-term scope and strategic benefits of our plug and play business strategy are to be able to carry out business on a global basis at a lower cost and be better informed and more adaptive to changing market conditions, which is dependent on securing these relationships.

 

2

 

 

C-Bond Authorized Distributor Network

 

Our Authorized Distributor Program focuses on channeling distribution agreements with industry specific business-to-business and original equipment manufacturing customers to develop a global distribution network. This program aims to partner with high quality distributors that can grow revenues and margins. For the year ended December 31, 2022, no customer accounted for over 10% of total sales. For the year ended December 31, 2022, all sales were in the United States. Almost all sales generated through Mobile are performed in Texas. No other geographical area accounted for more than 10% of total sales during the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021. A reduction in sales from or loss of our customers could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated results of operations and financial condition.

 

Suppliers

 

Currently, we rely on two main suppliers, Madico, Inc. and Eastman Performance Films, LLC, for our window film; one main supplier, Gelest, Inc., for our chemicals; and one main supplier, Quip Laboratories, for disinfectant products.  However, we believe that, if necessary, alternate window film and chemical suppliers could be found without material disruption to our business.

 

Intellectual Property

 

To date, we have filed, licensed and/or acquired a total of 23 individual patents and patent applications spanning core and strategic nano-technology applications and processes. We intend to continue to expand our patent coverage. Our focus remains on building a patent portfolio that protects our core intellectual property and delivers shareholder value.

 

We own four provisional United States patents and licenses, seven United States patents, and 12 foreign patents on a non-exclusive basis from William Marsh Rice University (“Rice University”) with claims directed toward various aspects of our current products and products under development including the use of nanotechnology for glass strengthening and the processes and composition of our products.

 

Pursuant to an agreement dated April 8, 2016, between us and Rice University, Rice University has granted a non-exclusive license to us, in nanotube-based surface treatment for strengthening glass and related materials under Rice’s intellectual property rights, to use, make, distribute, offer and sell the licensed products specified in the agreement. In consideration, we had to pay a one-time non-refundable license fee of $10,000 and royalty payments of 5% of net sales of the licensed products during the term of the agreement and a sell-off period of 180 days from termination. In addition, we are required to pay for the maintenance of the patents.  This agreement will continue until the expiration of the last to expire of the licensed property rights, unless terminated earlier in accordance with the terms of the agreement. To date, no royalties have been due under this agreement.

 

The “C-Bond™” and “C-Bond nanoShield™” names and logos are registered trademarks issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

 

Research and Development

 

We did not incur any research and development expenses during 2022.

 

Competition

 

C-Bond nanoshield Windshield Performance System

 

We believe we have no direct competition in the windshield glass strengthening space.

 

C-Bond nanoShield also provides a complementary hydrophobic or water repellent quality. There are competitors in this space, including Rain-X, AquaPel, and Diamon-Fusion. We believe these products do not provide chip or crack resistance and have hydrophobic properties that degrade sooner than C-Bond nanoShield. Accordingly, management believes there is no product that is truly comparable to C-Bond nanoShield currently on the market.  We had the performance of C-Bond nanoShield verified at our request, based on a modified chip test for paint on metal parts, SAEJ 400, to provide windshield glass chip protection when compared to untreated glass.

 

3

 

 

C-Bond Secure Glass Strengthening Primer and Window Film Mounting Solution

 

C-Bond Secure faces competition from alternative window film mounting products in the market; however, all these products have similar ingredients to a soap and water mix, which we believe provides no structural benefit.  These solutions are used to provide a window film installer the ability to slip or move the film on the surface to which it is applied.  The industry standard solution most commonly used to apply window film to glass is a mixture containing commonly available baby shampoo or dishwashing soap and water that we believe has the following negative attributes: provides no structural benefits, often bubbles or yellows and scatters light, can only be applied within a limited temperature range, and may require 30 to 120 days of “dry” time to set completely depending on the film thickness.  C-Bond Secure provides the same slip properties while also strengthening the glass and improving film adhesion.

 

C-Bond BRS

 

C-Bond BRS faces competition from alternative bulletproof or bullet-resistant glass products in the market. Alternative bulletproof solutions use polycarbonate or glass laminate materials that are expensive, thick, heavy, often require reframing and retrofit of existing structure and revised building codes, and yellow and discolor over time.  These alternative solutions are often cost prohibitive to cost sensitive customers such as educational and municipal facilities.  C-Bond BRS allows for increased safety and security at an affordable cost.  Most importantly, it provides a deterrent to an intruder and valuable time to secure the facility.

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2022, C-Bond had one full-time employee, and multiple part-time employees, including our chief executive officer, who operate as independent contractors of the Company. Additionally, Mobile had 16 full-time employees and 3 independent contractors. We have established an extensive network of external partners, contractors, and consultants to minimize administrative overhead and maximize efficiency.

 

We believe that a diverse workforce is important to our success. We will continue to focus on the hiring, retention and advancement of women and underrepresented populations, and to cultivate an inclusive and diverse corporate culture. In the future, we intend to continue to evaluate our use of human capital measures or objectives in managing our business such as the factors we employ or seek to employ in the development, attraction and retention of personnel and maintenance of diversity in our workforce.

 

The success of our business is fundamentally connected to the well-being of our people. Accordingly, we are committed to the health, safety and wellness of our employees. We provide our employees and their families with access to a variety of innovative, flexible and convenient health and wellness programs, including benefits that provide protection and security so they can have peace of mind concerning events that may require time away from work or that impact their financial well-being; that support their physical and mental health by providing tools and resources to help them improve or maintain their health status and encourage engagement in healthy behaviors; and that offer choice where possible so they can customize their benefits to meet their needs and the needs of their families.

 

We also provide robust compensation and benefits programs to help meet the needs of our employees. We believe that we maintain a satisfactory working relationship with our employees and have not experienced any labor disputes.

 

General Company Information

 

C-Bond Systems, Inc., formerly WestMountain Alternative Energy, Inc. (“WestMountain”), was incorporated in the state of Colorado on November 13, 2007. C-Bond Systems, LLC is a Texas-based limited liability company that was formed in 2013, headquartered in Houston, Texas. On April 25, 2018, WestMountain Energy, WestMountain’s wholly owned subsidiary, WETM Acquisition Corp., a corporation formed in the State of Colorado on April 18, 2018, (the “Acquisition Sub”), and C-Bond Systems, LLC, entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger and Reorganization (“Merger Agreement”). Pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement, on April 25, 2018, referred to as the Closing Date, the Acquisition Sub merged with and into C-Bond Systems, LLC, which was the surviving corporation and became a wholly owned subsidiary of WestMountain (the “Merger”). The Merger was effective as of April 26, 2018, upon the filing of a Certificate of Merger with the Secretary of State of the State of Texas. On July 18, 2018, we changed our name to C-Bond Systems, Inc.  Our common stock is currently quoted on the OTC Pink marketplace on a limited basis under the trading symbol “CBNT”. Our principal executive offices are located at 6035 South Loop East, Houston, Texas, 77033. Our website address is http://cbondsystems.com/, and our telephone number is (832) 649-5658. The content of any website of ours is not a part of, or incorporated by reference in, this Report. The Company’s Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to reports filed pursuant to Sections 13(a) and 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), are filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). These reports and any other information filed by the Company with the SEC are available free of charge on our website. The SEC maintains an internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at www.sec.gov.

 

4

 

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should not invest in our stock unless you are able to bear the complete loss of your investment. You should carefully consider the risks described below, as well as other information provided to you in this annual report on Form 10-K, including information in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Information” before making an investment decision. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones facing C-Bond Systems. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently believe are immaterial may also impair our business operations. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected, the value of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

 

We have incurred substantial losses to date, may continue to incur losses in the future, and we may never achieve or sustain profitability.

 

We have incurred substantial net losses since our inception, including net losses of $5,156,478 and $7,128,858 (which included stock-based compensation of $1,039,943 and $4,085,868, respectively), for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively, and these losses may continue. The net cash used in operations was $1,584,918 and $1,807,051 for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. As of December 31, 2022, we had an accumulated deficit, shareholders’ deficit, and working capital deficit of $62,693,184, $7,050,669 and $4,349,384, respectively. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of this report. Management cannot provide assurance that the Company will ultimately achieve profitable operations or become cash flow positive or raise additional debt and/or equity capital.

 

Our ability to continue as a going concern will require us to obtain additional financing to fund our current operations, which may be unavailable on attractive terms, if at all.

 

As of December 31, 2022, our recurring operating losses, cash used in operations and our current operating plans raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of this report. Our ability to continue as a going concern will require us to obtain additional financing to fund our current operating plans. We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents will not be sufficient to fund our current operating plans. If we are unable to raise capital when needed or on attractive terms, we would be forced to delay, reduce or eliminate our commercialization efforts.

 

Unfavorable global economic, business, or political conditions could adversely affect our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

 

Our results of operations could be adversely affected by general conditions in the global economy and in the global financial markets, including conditions that are outside of our control, including the impact of health and safety concerns, such as those relating to the current COVID-19 outbreak. The most recent global financial crisis caused extreme volatility and disruptions in the capital and credit markets. A severe or prolonged economic downturn could result in a variety of risks to our business, including weakened demand for our products and our ability to raise additional capital when needed on acceptable terms, if at all. A weak or declining economy could strain our domestic and international customers, possibly resulting in delays in customer payments. Any of the foregoing could harm our business and we cannot anticipate all the ways in which the current economic climate and financial market conditions could adversely impact our business.

 

We hold our cash and cash equivalents that we use to meet our working capital and operating expense needs in deposit accounts that could be adversely affected if the financial institution holding such funds fails.

 

We hold our cash and cash equivalents that we use to meet our working capital and operating expense needs in deposit accounts. At times, the balance held in these accounts may exceed the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or FDIC, standard deposit insurance limit of $250,000. If the financial institution in which we hold such funds fails or is subject to significant adverse conditions in the financial or credit markets, we could be subject to a risk of loss of all or a portion of such uninsured funds or be subject to a delay in accessing all or a portion of such uninsured funds. Any such loss or lack of access to these funds could adversely impact our short-term liquidity and ability to meet our operating expense obligations, including payroll obligations.

 

For example, on March 10, 2023, Silicon Valley Bank, or SVB, and Signature Bank, were closed by state regulators and the FDIC was appointed receiver for each bank. The FDIC created successor bridge banks and all deposits of SVB and Signature Bank were transferred to the bridge banks under a systemic risk exception approved by the United States Department of the Treasury, the Federal Reserve and the FDIC. If the financial institution in which we hold funds for working capital and operating expenses were to fail, we cannot provide any assurances that such governmental agencies would take action to protect our uninsured deposits or investments in a similar manner.

 

5

 

 

Our future revenues are very difficult to predict with any accuracy.

 

Predicting the timing or the amount of revenues that we will receive from the sale, or license, of our products is very difficult. Any delay in the development and acceptance of one or more of our products, could result in significant delays in the realization of revenues, the need to raise additional capital through the issuance of additional equity or debt securities sooner than we intend, and may allow competitors to reach certain of such markets with products before we do. In view of the emerging nature of the technology involved in certain of these markets, and the attendant uncertainty as to whether our products will achieve meaningful commercial acceptance, if at all, there can be no assurance that we will realize revenues sufficient to achieve profitability.

 

Our intellectual property is subject to patents and exclusive license agreements that may expire or change.

 

We rely on U.S. patents to protect our propriety products that form the core of our revenue potential. These patents are subject to standard patent expiration terms. Upon expiration of our patents, we will no longer be able to prevent our competitors from developing similar products to ours. Additionally, we rely on exclusive license agreements to use certain technologies. The terms of the exclusive license agreements may change upon expiration of their current terms. We may not be able to renew or extend our current licenses, or they may become non-exclusive licensees. The inability to maintain our exclusive licenses agreements would have a significant impact on our potential future revenues.

 

If we are unable to adequately protect our intellectual property, our competitive position and results of operations may be adversely impacted.

 

Protecting our intellectual property is critical to our innovation efforts. We own patents, trade secrets, copyrights, trademarks and/or other intellectual property rights related to many of our products, and also have exclusive and non-exclusive license rights under intellectual property owned by others. Our intellectual property rights may be challenged or infringed upon by third parties, particularly in countries where property rights are not highly developed or protected, or we may be unable to maintain, renew or enter into new license agreements with third-party owners of intellectual property on reasonable terms. Unauthorized use of our intellectual property rights or inability to preserve existing intellectual property rights could adversely impact our competitive position and results of operations.

 

We are dependent on key personnel, and our ability to grow and compete in our industry will be harmed if we do not retain the continued services of our key personnel, or we fail to identify, hire, and retain additional qualified personnel.

 

Our success depends on the efforts of our senior management team and other key personnel. The loss of services of members of our senior management team could have an adverse effect on our business. In addition, if we expect to grow our operations, it will be necessary for us to attract and retain additional qualified personnel. If we are unable to attract or retain qualified personnel as needed, the growth of our operations could be slowed or hampered.

 

Potential adverse outcomes in legal proceedings may adversely affect results.

 

Our business exposes us to product liability claims that are inherent in the design, manufacture and sale of our products and the products of suppliers. We may not be able to obtain insurance on acceptable terms or our insurance may not provide adequate protection against actual losses. In addition, we are subject to the risk that one or more of our insurers may become insolvent and become unable to pay claims that may be made in the future. Even if we maintain adequate insurance, claims could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations and on our ability to obtain suitable, adequate or cost-effective insurance in the future.

 

6

 

 

If we are unable to successfully introduce new products, our future growth may be adversely affected.

 

Our ability or failure to develop new products based on innovation can affect our competitive position and requires the investment of significant time and resources. Difficulties or delays in research, development, production or commercialization of new products and services may reduce future revenues and adversely affect our competitive position. If we are unable to create sustainable product differentiation, our organic growth may be adversely affected.

 

Research and development for continued growth of our IP portfolio and product offerings is expensive, and we may not have sufficient funds to continue research and develop activities and may not be able to acquire additional funding.

 

Our ability to continue our research and development activities to improve and expand our products and service offerings requires extensive amounts of funding. We may not be able to obtain the necessary funding on attractive terms and in a timely basis to continue our research and development activities, which has caused our research and development activities to be delayed, reduced or terminated. Delaying, reducing or terminating our research activities would impede our estimated growth and results of operations.

 

We rely heavily on collaborative partners such as distributors, manufacturers and vendors and our relationships with such parties may restrict or limit our business operations.

 

We are currently working with several third-party entities with respect to the validation, optimization, and distribution of our products. Our current and future collaborations and joint ventures are important as they allow greater access to funds, to research, development and testing resources, validation, and to manufacturing, sales and distribution resources that we would otherwise not have. We intend to continue to significantly rely on such collaborative and joint venture arrangements. Some of the risks and uncertainties related to the reliance on such collaborations and joint ventures include the fact that such relationships could actually serve to limit or restrict us, while our partners are free to pursue other products either on their own or with others. Further, our partners may terminate a collaborative technology relationship and such termination may require us to seek other partners or expend substantial resources to pursue these activities independently.

 

We rely primarily on a third-party distribution model for our products and the number and quality of distributors can vary and may impact our revenues.

 

We rely on numerous third-party distributors for the distribution of our products. While we believe that alternative distributors could be located if required, our product sales could be affected if any of these distributors do not continue to distribute our products in required quantities or at all, or with the required levels of quality. In addition, difficulties encountered by these distributors, such as fire, accident, natural disasters, or political unrest, could halt or disrupt distributions, resulting in delay or cancellation of orders. Any of these events could result in delayed deliveries by us of our products, causing reduced sales and harm to our reputation and brand name.

 

We only have one manufacturing facility for our propriety products.

 

We manufacture our proprietary products at our Houston, Texas facility. In the event of a fire, flood, tornado, hurricane or other form of a catastrophic event, we may be unable to fulfill any then-existing demand for our products, possibly for a prolonged period, depending upon the severity of the event. As a result, should a catastrophic event occur, our financial condition and results of operation would be materially adversely affected.

 

Our lease on our Houston, Texas facility expires on May 31, 2025. If we are not able to renew or extend our lease on the Houston, Texas facility, we may have to move our corporate headquarters and manufacturing facility. Doing so could cause us to incur significant expenses and could delay or reduce our ability to manufacture our products for some time. Our financial condition and results of operation could be materially adversely affected by any such move.

 

7

 

 

The requirements of being a public company may strain our resources, divert management’s attention, and affect our ability to attract and retain qualified members of the board of directors.

 

As a public company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), the Dodd-Frank Act, the listing requirements of the OTC and other applicable securities rules and regulations. Compliance with these rules and regulations requires significant legal and financial compliance costs, makes some activities more difficult, time-consuming or costly and increases demand on our systems and resources. The Exchange Act requires, among other things, that we file annual, quarterly and current reports with respect to our business and operating results. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. In order to maintain and, if required, improve our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting to meet this standard, significant resources and management oversight may be required. As a result, management’s attention may be diverted from other business concerns, which could harm our business and operating results. We may need to hire more employees in the future to comply with these regulatory requirements, which will increase our costs and expenses.

 

In addition, changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure are creating uncertainty for public companies, increasing legal and financial compliance costs and making some activities more time consuming. These laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations, in many cases due to their lack of specificity, and, as a result, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies. This could result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and higher costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to disclosure and governance practices. We intend to invest resources to comply with evolving laws, regulations and standards, and this investment may result in increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management’s time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities. If our efforts to comply with new laws, regulations and standards differ from the activities intended by regulatory or governing bodies due to ambiguities related to practice, regulatory authorities may initiate legal proceedings against us and our business may be harmed.

 

We also expect that being a public company with these new rules and regulations will make it more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain coverage. These factors could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified members for our board of directors, particularly to serve any committees, and qualified executive officers.

 

As a result of disclosure of information in filings required of a public company, our business and financial condition will become more visible, which we believe may result in threatened or actual litigation, including by competitors and other third parties. If such claims are successful, our business and operating results could be harmed, and even if the claims do not result in litigation or are resolved in our favor, these claims, and the time and resources necessary to resolve them, could divert the resources of our management and harm our business and operating results.

 

We may not reach sufficient size to justify our public reporting status. If we are forced to become a private company, then our stockholders may lose their ability to sell their shares.

 

We may not be able to fulfill our obligation to develop and maintain proper and effective internal controls over financial reporting.

 

We are required, pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, to furnish a report by management on, among other things, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting annually. This assessment needs to include disclosure of any material weaknesses identified by our management in our internal control over financial reporting. Management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2022 was not effective, see “We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting which could, if not remediated, result in a material misstatement in our financial statement.” below. In the future, we may not be able to complete our evaluation, testing and any required remediation in a timely fashion. Failure to comply, or any adverse results from such evaluation, could result in a loss of investor confidence in our financial reports and have an adverse effect on the trading price of our equity securities. Achieving continued compliance with Section 404 may require us to incur significant costs and expend significant time and management resources. We cannot assure you that we will be able to fully comply with Section 404 or that we will be able to conclude that our internal control over financial reporting is effective.

 

8

 

 

Risks Related to the Glass Strengthening and Water Repellent Industries

 

We face competition from companies that have substantially greater capital resources, research and development, manufacturing, and marketing resources.

 

While we believe that we have significant competitive benefits offered by our proprietary products, there are competitors with much longer operating histories, greater name recognition, larger customer bases and significantly greater financial, technical, and marketing resources than we have. As we grow and become successful with our products, we expect these competitors to increase the resources they dedicate to our market. Such competition could materially adversely affect our business, operating results, or financial condition.

 

We may face increased pricing pressures from current and future competitors and, accordingly, there can be no assurance that competitive pressures will not require us to reduce our prices.

 

It is likely that we will experience significant competitive pressure over time. Accordingly, the use and pricing of our products may decline as the market becomes more competitive. Any material reduction in the price of our products will negatively affect our gross margin and results of operations.

 

We may have difficulty developing brand awareness for our products.

 

We believe that a developed market for glass strengthening products currently does not exist. Generation of the brand and market communications are essential to the Company’s long-term success. Funding constraints will limit the Company’s ability to build product awareness through marketing and advertising. Without clear market communication the risk of having the product confused with other applications such as a stand-alone hydrophobic product is possible. If we are unable to develop such a market or create demand for our products, it would adversely impact our business and operating results.

 

Risks Related to our Common Stock

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTC Pink, which may limit the liquidity and price of our common stock more than if our common stock were listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market or another national exchange.

 

Our securities are currently quoted on the OTC Markets, specifically the OTC Pink (the “OTC Pink”), an inter-dealer automated quotation system for equity securities. Quotation of our securities on the OTC Pink may limit the liquidity and price of our securities more than if our securities were listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market or another national exchange. As an OTC Pink company, we do not attract the extensive analyst coverage that accompanies companies listed on national securities exchanges. Further, institutional and other investors may have investment guidelines that restrict or prohibit investing in securities traded on the OTC Pink. These factors may have an adverse impact on the trading and price of our common stock.

 

 

The trading price of our common stock may decrease due to factors beyond our control.

 

The stock market from time to time has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations, which have particularly affected the market prices for smaller reporting companies, and which often have been unrelated to the operating performance of the companies. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock. If our shareholders sell substantial amounts of their common stock in the public market, the price of our common stock could fall. These sales also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity, or equity-related securities, in the future at a price we deem appropriate.

 

9

 

 

The market price of our common stock may also fluctuate significantly in response to the following factors, most of which are beyond our control:

 

  variations in our quarterly operating results,

 

  changes in general economic conditions and in our industry,

 

  changes in market valuations of similar companies,

 

  announcements by us or our competitors of significant new contracts, acquisitions, strategic partnerships or joint ventures, or capital commitments,

 

  loss of a major customer, partner or joint venture participant and

 

  the addition or loss of key managerial and collaborative personnel.

 

Any such fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock, regardless of our actual operating performance. As a result, stockholders may be unable to sell their shares, or may be forced to sell them at a loss.

 

The market price for our common shares is particularly volatile given our status as a relatively unknown company with a small and thinly traded public float, limited operating history and lack of profits which could lead to wide fluctuations in our share price. You may be unable to sell your common shares at or above your purchase price, which may result in substantial losses to you.

 

The market for our common shares is characterized by significant price volatility when compared to seasoned issuers, and we expect that our share price will continue to be more volatile than a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. The volatility in our share price is attributable to a number of factors. First, as noted above, our common shares are sporadically and thinly traded. As a consequence of this lack of liquidity, the trading of relatively small quantities of shares by our shareholders may disproportionately influence the price of those shares in either direction. The price for our shares could, for example, decline precipitously in the event that a large number of our common shares are sold on the market without commensurate demand, as compared to a seasoned issuer which could better absorb those sales without adverse impact on its share price. Secondly, we are a speculative or “risky” investment due to our limited operating history and lack of profits to date. As a consequence of this enhanced risk, more risk-adverse investors may, under the fear of losing all or most of their investment in the event of negative news or lack of progress, be more inclined to sell their shares on the market more quickly and at greater discounts than would be the case with the stock of a seasoned issuer. Many of these factors are beyond our control and may decrease the market price of our common shares, regardless of our operating performance. We cannot make any predictions or projections as to what the prevailing market price for our common shares will be at any time, including as to whether our common shares will sustain their current market prices, or as to what effect that the sale of shares or the availability of common shares for sale at any time will have on the prevailing market price.

 

Penny stock regulations may impose certain restrictions on marketability of our securities.

 

Our common stock is subject to penny stock rules, which may discourage broker-dealers from effecting transactions in our common stock or affect their ability to sell our securities. As a result, purchasers and current holders of our securities could find it more difficult to sell their securities. Trading volume of OTC Pink stocks have been historically lower and more volatile than stocks traded on an exchange or the Nasdaq Stock Market. In addition, we may be subject to rules of the SEC that impose additional requirements on broker-dealers when selling penny stocks to persons other than established customers and accredited investors. In general, an accredited investor is a person with net worth in excess of $1,000,000 or annual income exceeding $200,000 individually, or $300,000 together with his or her spouse. The relevant SEC regulations generally define penny stocks to include any equity security not traded on an exchange or the Nasdaq Stock Market with a market price (as defined in the regulations) of less than $5 per share. Under the penny stock regulations, a broker-dealer must make a special suitability determination as to the purchaser and must have the purchaser’s prior written consent to the transaction. Prior to any transaction in a penny stock covered by these rules, a broker-dealer must deliver a disclosure schedule about the penny stock market prepared by the SEC. Broker-dealers must also make disclosure concerning commissions payable to both the broker-dealer and any registered representative and provide current quotations for the securities. Finally, broker-dealers are required to send monthly statements disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in an account and information on the limited market in penny stocks.

 

You may find it difficult to sell our common stock.

 

As mentioned above, there has been a limited trading market in our common stock. We cannot assure you that an active trading market for our common stock will develop or be sustained. Regardless of whether an active and liquid public market exists, negative fluctuations in our actual or anticipated operating results will likely cause the market price of our common stock to fall, making it more difficult for you to sell our common stock at a favorable price, or at all.

 

10

 

 

We intend to issue additional equity and stock options to employees and consultants as compensation in the future, which will result in dilution to existing and new investors.

 

We provide and intend to continue to provide additional equity-based compensation to our employees, officers, directors, consultants, and independent contractors through an equity incentive plan. Our equity incentive plan permits the award of options to purchase shares of common stock and the issuance of restricted shares of our common stock. Because stock options granted under the plan will generally only be exercised when the exercise price for such option is below the then market value of the common stock, the exercise of such options or the issuance of shares will cause dilution to the book value per share of our common stock and to existing and new investors.

 

Holders of convertible debt issued by the Company may convert their promissory notes and exercise warrants into shares of our common stock, which will result in significant dilution to existing and new investors.

 

We closed a various financing transactions in 2021 and 2022 with investors whereby the respective investor purchased convertible promissory notes and warrants from the Company. If the investors convert their notes and exercise their warrants, the Company will issue shares of the Company’s common stock to the investor, which may cause substantial dilution to the book value per share of our common stock and to existing and new investors.

 

Holders of Series B Preferred Shares or Series C Preferred Shares issued by the Company may, as of December 31, 2022, convert such shares into approximately 164,635,079 and 432,250,000 shares of our common stock, respectively, which could result in significant dilution to existing and new investors. 

  

As of December 31, 2022, we had 1,000 Series B and 17,290 Series C shares of Preferred Stock issued and outstanding. If a holder of Series B Preferred shares or Series C Preferred shares issued by the Company elects to convert such shares into approximately 164,635,079 and 432,250,000 shares of our common stock, respectively, it would result in significant dilution to existing and new investors.

 

Sales of a substantial number of shares of our common stock in the public market by our existing stockholders could cause our stock price to fall.

 

We have not entered into lock-up agreements with any of our existing stockholders. As a result, sales of a substantial number of shares of our common stock in the public market could depress the market price of our common stock and could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional equity securities. We are unable to predict the effect that sales may have on the prevailing market price of our common stock.

 

Our stock price is likely to be volatile.

 

There is generally significant volatility in the market prices and limited liquidity of securities of companies at our stage. Contributing to this volatility are various events that can affect our stock price in a positive or negative manner. These events include, but are not limited to: governmental regulations or actions; market acceptance and sales growth of our products; litigation involving our industry; developments or disputes concerning our patents or other proprietary rights; departure of key personnel; future sales of our securities; fluctuations in our financial results or those of companies that are perceived to be similar to us; investors’ general perception of us; announcements by us of significant contracts, acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments, and general economic, industry and market conditions. If any of these events occur, it could cause our stock price to fall.

 

The price of our common stock may be adversely affected by the future issuance and sale of shares of our common stock or other equity securities.

 

We cannot predict the size of future issuances or sales of our common stock or other equity securities future acquisitions or capital raising activities, or the effect, if any, that such issuances or sales may have on the market price of our common stock. The issuance and sale of substantial amounts of common stock or other equity securities or announcement that such issuances and sales may occur, could adversely affect the market price of our common stock. Any decline in the price of our common stock may encourage short sales, which could place further downward pressure on the price of our common stock and may impair our ability to raise additional capital through the sale of equity securities.

 

11

 

 

Our reduced stock price may adversely affect our liquidity.

 

Our common stock has limited trading history. Many market makers are reluctant to make a market in stock with a trading price of less than $5.00 per share, as well as shares quoted on the OTC Pink. To the extent that we have fewer market makers for our common stock, our volume and liquidity will likely decline, which could further depress our stock price.

 

We have never paid dividends on our common stock and cannot guarantee that we will pay dividends to our stockholders in the future.

 

We have never paid dividends on our common stock. For the foreseeable future, we intend to retain our future earnings, if any, to reinvest in the development and growth of our business and, therefore, do not intend to pay dividends on our common stock. However, in the future, our board of directors may declare dividends on our common stock. Any future determination to pay dividends will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on our financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements, and such other factors as our board of directors deems relevant. Accordingly, investors may need to sell their shares of our common stock to realize a return on their investment, and they may not be able to sell such shares at or above the price paid for them. We cannot guarantee that we will pay dividends to our stockholders in the future. 

 

Colorado law and our Articles of Incorporation protect our directors from certain types of lawsuits, which could make it difficult for us to recover damages from them in the event of a lawsuit.

 

Colorado law provides that our directors will not be liable to our company or to our stockholders for monetary damages for all but certain types of conduct as directors. Our Articles of Incorporation require us to indemnify our directors and officers against all damages incurred in connection with our business to the fullest extent provided or allowed by law. The exculpation provisions may have the effect of preventing stockholders from recovering damages against our directors caused by their negligence, poor judgment, or other circumstances. The indemnification provisions may require our company to use our assets to defend our directors and officers against claims, including claims arising out of their negligence, poor judgment, or other circumstances.

 

Additional risks may exist since we became public through a “reverse merger.”

 

Because our business became public by means of a “reverse merger,” we may not be able to attract the attention of major brokerage firms. Securities analysts of major brokerage firms may not provide coverage of us since there is little incentive to brokerage firms to recommend the purchase of our common stock. We cannot assure you that brokerage firms will want to conduct any secondary offerings on our behalf in the future.

 

We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting which could, if not remediated, result in a material misstatement in our financial statements.

 

We are subject to the reporting and other obligations under the Exchange Act, including the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which require annual management assessments of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. As reported in Item 9A hereof, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of December 31, 2022 because of a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting. The ineffectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures was due to the following material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting: (1) the lack of multiple levels of management review on complex business, accounting, and financial reporting issues and (2) a lack of adequate segregation of duties as a result of our limited financial resources to support hiring of personnel. Until such time as we expand our staff to include additional accounting and executive personnel, it is likely we will continue to report material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. 

 

While management has undertaken and will continue to undertake steps to improve our internal control over financial reporting to address and remediate the material weaknesses, there can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully remediate the identified material weaknesses, or that we will not identify additional control deficiencies or material weaknesses in the future. If we are unable to successfully remediate our existing or any future material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, the accuracy and timing of our financial reporting may be adversely affected, we may be unable to maintain compliance with securities laws regarding the timely filing of periodic reports, investors may lose confidence in our financial reporting and the price of our ordinary shares may decline.

 

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ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

On January 20, 2022, we received an Order Directing Examination and Designating Officers to Take Testimony (a “Formal Order”) from the SEC. The Formal Order authorizes that an examination be made to determine whether a stop order should be issued under Section 8(d) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) with respect to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, and any supplements and amendments thereto. The Formal Order indicates that the Form S-1 may be deficient in that it may contain untrue statements of material fact or omit to state material facts necessary in order to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which they were made, not misleading concerning, among other things, the Company’s revenue and financial condition. 

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

Our corporate headquarters and manufacturing facility is located in an 8,385 square foot facility in Houston, Texas at 6035 South Loop East. The lease on the Houston facility expires on May 31, 2025.

 

In connection with the Exchange Agreement with Mobile, the Company was named as guarantor of a Commercial Lease Agreement dated July 21, 2021, by and between landlord MDW Management, LLC, a company owned by Michael Wanke and his wife and tenant Mobile. The term of this lease is 60 months, at a minimum monthly rent of $5,600 (not including tax), with two five-year options for the tenant to renew. The Company’s obligation as guarantor of the Lease will terminate upon the occurrence of earlier of the following: (i) the date of the Company’s acquisition of 100% of the ownership interests of Mobile; (ii) the date that the Company beneficially owns less than an 80%)ownership interest in Mobile; or (iii) two (2) years from and after the effective date of the guaranty. Our Mobile manufacturing and warehouse facility is located in an approximate 4,000 square foot facility in Universal City, Texas at 2029 Pat Booker Rd.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

From time to time, we may become involved in various lawsuits and legal proceedings which arise in the ordinary course of business. However, litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in these or other matters may arise from time to time that may harm business.

  

Except as set forth below, the Company is not involved in any pending or threatened legal proceedings that it believes could reasonably be expected to have a material adverse effect on its financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

 

On January 20, 2022, we received the “Formal Order” from the SEC. The Formal Order authorizes that an examination be made to determine whether a stop order should be issued under Section 8(d) of the Securities Act with respect to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, and any supplements and amendments thereto. The Formal Order indicates that the Form S-1 may be deficient in that it may contain untrue statements of material fact or omit to state material facts necessary in order to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which they were made, not misleading concerning, among other things, the Company’s revenue and financial condition.

 

On March 8, 2021, a former officer of the Company resigned. The Company and the former officer alleged certain claims against each other, including certain compensation claims. Neither party has initiated litigation. The Company intends to vigorously defend itself against any possible claims and assert any relevant claims against the former executive and believes it will prevail.

 

In July 2021, a former employee of the Company filed a small claims case for approximately $16,000 in Harris County, TX, and the Company filed its response on August 2021. This case is no longer shown as pending with the Harris County, Texas Court system. The Company intends to vigorously defend itself against any claim made and believes it will prevail.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTC Pink operated by the OTC Markets Group, under the symbol “CBNT.” Trading in OTC Pink stocks can be volatile, sporadic and risky, as thinly traded stocks tend to move more rapidly in price than more liquid securities. Such trading may also depress the market price of our common stock and make it difficult for our stockholders to resell their common stock. Our common stock does not have an established public trading market.

 

The following table reflects the high and low closing price for our common stock for the period indicated. The bid information was obtained from the OTC Markets Group, Inc. and reflects inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, markdown or commission, and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

Quarter Ended  High   Low 
December 31, 2022  $0.0160   $0.0050 
September 30, 2022  $0.0170   $0.0070 
June 30, 2022  $0.0289   $0.0106 
March 31, 2022  $0.0300   $0.0130 
December 31, 2021  $0.05   $0.02 
September 30, 2021  $0.05   $0.02 
June 30, 2021  $0.06   $0.02 
March 31, 2021  $0.15   $0.04 

 

On March 30, 2023, the closing price of the Company’s common stock on OTC Pink was $0.0048.

 

Holders of Common Stock

 

As of March 30, 2023, there were approximately 213 record holders of our common stock. The number of record holders does not include beneficial owners of common stock whose shares are held in the names of banks, brokers, nominees, or other fiduciaries.

 

Dividends

 

Historically, we have not paid any cash dividends on our common stock. It is our present intention not to pay any cash dividends in the foreseeable future, but rather to reinvest earnings, if any, in our business operations. However, in the future, our board of directors may declare dividends on our common stock. Payment of future dividends on our common stock, if any, will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, cash requirements and surplus, financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors that our board of directors may deem relevant. We cannot guarantee that we will pay dividends to our stockholders in the future.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

See “Part III. Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters” for information concerning our equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2022.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

  

On October 3, 2022, we issued 3,000,000 shares of our common stock for investor relations services to be rendered.

 

On December 1, 2022, we issued 6,535,274 shares our common stock upon the conversion of 250 shares of Series C preferred with a stated redemption value of $25,000. The conversion price was based on contractual terms of the related Series C preferred shares.

 

In connection with the Letter Agreement dated December 15, 2022, in order to induce GS Capital to extend the due dates of the GS Capital Notes, we issued 15,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to GS Capital.

 

The above securities were issued in reliance upon the exemptions provided by Section 4(a)(2) under the Securities Act.

 

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Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

 

None.

 

ITEM 6. [RESERVED]

  

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes and other financial information included in this Report. Some of the information contained in this discussion and analysis or set forth elsewhere in this Report, including information with respect to our plans and strategy for our business, includes forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties as described under the heading “Cautionary Note Regarding Our Forward-Looking Statements” elsewhere in this Report. You should review the disclosure under the heading “Risk Factors” in this Report for a discussion of important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results described in or implied by the forward-looking statements contained in the following discussion and analysis.

 

Overview

 

We are a nanotechnology company and sole owner, developer, and manufacturer of the patented C-Bond technology. We are engaged in the implementation of proprietary nanotechnology applications and processes to enhance properties of strength, functionality, and sustainability of brittle material systems. Our present primary focus is in the multi-billion-dollar glass and window film industry with target markets in the United States and internationally. We operate in two divisions: C-Bond Transportation Solutions and Patriot Glass Solutions. C-Bond Transportation Solutions sells a windshield strengthening, water repellent solution called C-Bond nanoShield™ as well as disinfection products. Patriot Glass Solutions sells multi-purpose glass strengthening primer and window film mounting solutions, including C-Bond BRS, a ballistic-resistant film system, and C-Bond Secure, a forced entry system.

 

To date, we have filed, licensed and/or acquired a total of 23 individual patents and patent applications spanning core and strategic nano-technology applications and processes. Our intellectual property portfolio was recently valued at $33.7 million by a leading, independent, global intellectual property valuation firm. The IP valuation firm’s review covered the valuation of our intangible assets including our developed technology, trade name, customer relationships, and assembled workforce, and the Company’s determination of the fair value or other amounts of any assets and liabilities including current assets, real property, personal property, and current liabilities. Our developed technology includes C-Bond nanoShield, C-Bond Secure, and C-Bond BRS. The valuation firm also reviewed historical and projected financial information for the Company giving consideration to general economic and industry trends.

 

On May 20, 2020, we entered into a two-year Distributor Agreement with an entity where we were appointed as a distributor to exclusively sell MB-10 Disinfectant Tablets for use in certain markets. In February 2022, we and the entity amended the Distributor Agreement to include the sale of Vimoba Tablets in those same markets and extended the term of the Distributor Agreement for another year. MB-10 Disinfectant Tablets are the most convenient way yet to deliver the benefits of chlorine dioxide to hygiene or biosafety programs. MB-10 disinfectant tablets have one of the broadest, most complete EPA registration labels on the market. It is a safe, easy, and effective way to disinfect a vehicle’s interior using an EPA registered disinfectant (Reg No.70060-19-46269) included on List N for use against human coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. It is proven effective against emerging viral pathogens, including enveloped and large and small non-enveloped viruses. MB-10 Tablets provide fast-acting virus and bacteria protection that is safe for all vehicle surfaces including LED screens and electronics without leaving a residue or odor. Vimoba Tablets are 100% non-corrosive, chlorine dioxide producing tablets that maintain the exact same efficacy, EPA Label claims, dilution rates and contact times as MB-10 Tablets, while including a buffering agent that makes the Vimoba solution completely non-corrosive on stainless steel – even after prolonged use or exposure – and even when the solution dries on the surface. We were appointed as a distributor to exclusively sell MB-10 Disinfectant Tablets and Vimoba Tablets for use in the following markets:

 

  Automotive, Trucking, RV, rental agencies (auto and truck), service vehicles (taxi, Uber, Lyft), mass transit (train, buses), golf carts, aviation, train, marine (potential future growth)
     
  Dealerships
     
  Global Distribution
     
  Service Providers
     
  Transportation Detailing.

 

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On June 30, 2021, we entered into a Share Exchange Agreement and Plan of Reorganization (the “Exchange Agreement”) with (i) Mobile Tint LLC, a Texas limited liability company doing business as A1 Glass Coating (“Mobile”), (ii) the sole member of Mobile (the “Mobile Member”), and (iii) Michael Wanke as the Representative of the Mobile Member. Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, we agreed to acquire 80% of Mobile’s member units, representing 80% of Mobile’s issued and outstanding capital stock (the “Mobile Member Units”). On July 22, 2021, we closed the Exchange Agreement and acquired 80% of the Mobile Shares. The Mobile Member Units were exchanged for restricted shares of the Company’s common stock, in an amount equal to $800,000, divided by the average of the closing prices of the Company’s common stock during the 30-day period immediately prior to the closing as defined in the Exchange Agreement. In connection with the Exchange Agreement, we issued 28,021,016 shares of its common stock. Two years after closing, we have the option to acquire the remaining 20% of Mobile’s issued and outstanding membership interests in exchange for a number of shares of the Company’s common stock equal to 300% of Mobile’s average EBIT value, divided by the price of the Company’s common stock as defined in the Exchange Agreement (the “Additional Closing”). Mobile provides quality window tint solutions for auto, home, and business owners across Texas, specializing in automotive window tinting, residential window film, and commercial window film that stop harmful UV rays from passing through its window films for reduced glare, comfortable temperatures, and lower energy bills. Mobile also carry products that offer forced-entry protection and films that protect glass from scratches, graffiti, other types of vandalism, and even bullets, including our C-Bond BRS and C-Bond Secure products. As part of the transaction, Mobile’s owner-operator, Michael Wanke, joined the Company as President of its Safety Patriot Glass Solutions Group. Mobile has been in business for more than 30 years and produced annual revenue of approximately $2 million in both 2019 and 2020. As part of the transaction, Mobile’s owner-operator, Michael Wanke, has agreed to join us as President of our Patriot Glass Solutions group.

 

We expect that our recent acquisition of Mobile will be the springboard to provide glass security solutions across the United States. We recently launched Patriot Glass Solutions to protect personal and business property across the United States using C-Bond’s proprietary glass strengthening technology to protects property from looting, rioting, break-ins, and gunfire. With our recent acquisition of Mobile, we are re-branding our Safety Solutions Group as “Patriot Glass Solutions.” Patriot Glass Solutions’ primary products include C-Bond BRS, a ballistic-resistant film system; and C-Bond Secure, a multi-purpose glass strengthening primer and window film mounting solution that deters forced entry.

 

The following discussion highlights our results of operations and the principal factors that have affected our financial condition as well as our liquidity and capital resources for the periods described and provides information that management believes is relevant for an assessment and understanding of the statements of financial condition and results of operations presented herein. The following discussion and analysis are based on our consolidated financial statements contained in this Report, which have been prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). You should read the discussion and analysis together with such financial statements and the related notes thereto.

 

Operating Overview

 

We are a nanotechnology company and sole owner, developer, and manufacturer of the patented C-Bond technology. We are engaged in the implementation of proprietary nanotechnology applications and processes to enhance properties of strength, functionality, and sustainability of brittle material systems. Our present primary focus is in the multi-billion-dollar glass and window film industry with target markets in the United States and internationally. We operate in two divisions: C-Bond Transportation Solutions and Patriot Glass Solutions. C-Bond Transportation Solutions, which sells a windshield strengthening, water repellent solution called C-Bond nanoShield™ as well as disinfection products, and Patriot Glass Solutions, which sells multi-purpose glass strengthening primer and window film mounting solutions, including C-Bond BRS, a ballistic-resistant film systems, and C-Bond Secure, a forced entry system. The C-Bond technology enables ordinary glass to dissipate energy by permeating the glass surface and detecting microscopic flaws and defects that are randomly distributed all over the glass surface. C-Bond’s unique qualities then work to locate and repair the identified surface imperfections that weaken the glass composite structure and ultimately act as failure initiators. The C-Bond formula is engineered to maintain original glass design integrity while increasing the mechanical performance properties of the glass unit. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic we created partnerships to distribute disinfection related products, which we began to sell in the second quarter of 2020. The Company currently sells MB-10 Tablets® and Vimoba® Tablets. 

 

Revenue is generated by the sale of products through distributors and directly to dealers. C-Bond nanoShield and disinfection sales are generated through distribution channels. Sales of C-Bond Secure are made primarily to window film dealers who offer the product as an upsell during installation. Revenue is generated from the sale of C-Bond BRS on a project basis. C-Bond BRS is specified into project plans providing authorized installers a competitive advantage.

 

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Additionally, through the acquisition of 80% of Mobile Tint, LLC, we now provide quality window tint solutions for auto, home, and business owners across Texas, specializing in automotive window tinting, residential window film, and commercial window film that stop harmful UV rays from passing through its window films for reduced glare, comfortable temperatures, and lower energy bills. Mobile also carries products that offer forced-entry protection and films that protect glass from scratches, graffiti, other types of vandalism, and even bullets, including our C-Bond BRS and C-Bond Secure products.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. As reflected in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, the Company had a net loss of $5,156,478 and $7,128,858 for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively, which included stock-based compensation of $1,039,943 and $4,085,868 for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. The net cash used in operations was $1,584,918 and $1,807,051 for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. Additionally, the Company had an accumulated deficit, shareholders’ deficit, and working capital deficit of $62,693,184, $7,050,669 and $4,349,384, respectively, on December 31, 2022. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of this report. Management cannot provide assurance that the Company will ultimately achieve profitable operations or become cash flow positive or raise additional debt and/or equity capital. The Company is seeking to raise capital through additional debt and/or equity financings to fund its operations in the future. Although the Company has historically raised capital from sales of common shares, preferred shares and from the issuance of convertible and other promissory notes, there is no assurance that it will be able to continue to do so. If the Company is unable to raise additional capital or secure additional lending in the near future, management expects that the Company will need to curtail its operations. These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern. 

 

COVID-19

 

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic and recommended containment and mitigation measures worldwide. We were materially affected by the COVID-19 outbreak to in 2020 and 2021 and the ultimate duration and severity of the outbreak and its impact on the economic environment and our business is uncertain. The Company saw a material decrease in sales from its international customers as a result of the unprecedented public health crisis from the COVID-19 pandemic and a decrease in domestic sales due to a decrease in business spending on discretionary items. As a result, during 2021 and 2020, the Company’s international customers delayed the ordering of products and delayed or defaulted on payment of balances due to the Company. The lack of collection of accounts receivable balances, which the Company believes was attributable to COVID-19, had a material impact on the cash flows of the Company. The Company believes that COVID-19 had minimal impact on its operations in 2022. The Company cannot estimate the future impact of the pandemic on its business. A severe or prolonged economic downturn could result in a variety of risks to the Company’s business, including weakened demand for its products and a decreased ability to raise additional capital when needed on acceptable terms, if at all. Currently, the Company is unable to estimate the impact of this event on its operations.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The following discussion and analysis of our consolidated financial condition and consolidated results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires management to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. Management continually evaluates such estimates, including those related to estimates for allowance for doubtful accounts on accounts receivable, the estimates for obsolete or slow moving inventory, estimated used in the calculation of percentage of completion on uncompleted jobs, purchase price allocation of acquired businesses, the useful life of property and equipment, assumptions used in assessing impairment of long-term assets, the estimate of the fair value of the right of use asset and lease liability, the valuation of redeemable and mandatorily redeemable preferred stock, the value of beneficial conversion features and deemed dividends, the valuation of deferred tax assets, and the fair value of non-cash equity transactions. Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Any future changes to these estimates and assumptions could cause a material change to our reported amounts of revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. Management believes the following critical accounting policies affect our more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of the consolidated financial statements.

 

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Segment reporting

 

During the year ended December 31, 2022 and from July 22, 2021 (date of acquisition of Mobile) to December 31, 2021, we operated in two reportable business segments - (1) the manufacture and sale of a windshield strengthening water repellent solution as well as a disinfection product, and the sale of multi-purpose glass strengthening primer and window film mounting solutions, including ballistic-resistant film systems and a forced entry system (the “C-Bond Segment”), and (2) the distribution and installation of window film solutions (the “Mobile Segment”). Our reportable segments were strategic business units that offered different products. They were managed separately based on the fundamental differences in their operations and locations.

 

Accounts receivable

 

The Company recognizes an allowance for losses on accounts receivable in an amount equal to the estimated probable losses net of recoveries. The allowance is based on an analysis of historical bad debt experience, current receivables aging, and expected future write-offs, as well as an assessment of specific identifiable customer accounts considered at risk or uncollectible. The expense associated with the allowance for doubtful accounts is recognized as general and administrative expense.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory, consisting of raw materials and finished goods, is stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value utilizing the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. A reserve is established when management determines that certain inventories may not be saleable. If inventory costs exceed expected net realizable value due to obsolescence or quantities in excess of expected demand, the Company will record reserves for the difference between the cost and the net realizable value. These reserves are recorded based on estimates and included in cost of sales.

 

Revenue recognition

 

We follow the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (the “FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASC 606”). This standard establishes a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes most of the existing revenue recognition guidance. ASC 606 requires an entity to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services and requires certain additional disclosures. 

 

We sell our products, which include standard warranties primarily to distributors and authorized dealers. Product sales are recognized at a point in time when the product is shipped to the customer and title is transferred and are recorded net of any discounts or allowances. The warranty does not represent a separate performance obligation.

 

Revenues from contracts for the distribution and installation of window film solutions are recognized over time on the basis of the Company’s estimates of the progress towards completion of contracts using various output or input methods depending on the type of contract terms including (1) the ratio of number of labor hours spent compared to the number of estimated labor hours to complete a job, (2) using the milestone method, or (3) using a units completed method. These methods are used because management considers these to be the best available measure of progress on these contracts. We use the same method for similar types of contracts. The asset, “contract assets” represents revenues recognized in excess of amounts billed. The liability, “contract liabilities,” represents billings in excess of revenues recognized.

 

Stock-based compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is accounted for based on the requirements of ASC 718 – “Compensation –Stock Compensation”, which requires recognition in the financial statements of the cost of employee, director, and non-employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments over the period the employee, director, or non-employee is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively, the vesting period). The ASC also requires measurement of the cost of employee, director, and non-employee services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award. The Company has elected to recognize forfeitures as they occur as permitted under Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-09 Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment.

 

See Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements for a summary of significant accounting policies and recent accounting pronouncements.

 

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Results of Operations

 

The following comparative analysis on results of operations was based primarily on the comparative consolidated financial statements, footnotes and related information for the periods identified below and should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and the notes to those statements for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, which are included elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K. The results discussed below are for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021.

 

Comparison of Results of Operations for the Years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021

 

Sales

 

For the year ended December 31, 2022, sales amounted to $2,232,646 as compared to $1,476,828 for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of $755,818, or 51.2%. The increase was primarily attributable to the acquisition of 80% of Mobile on July 22, 2021, which generated sales of $1,853,910 for the year ended December 31, 2022 as compared to $1,042,017 for the period from acquisition (July 22, 2021) to December 31, 2021, an increase in C-Bond nanoShield solution sales of $122,471, and an increase in disinfectant product of $3,574, offset by a decrease in sales of C-Bond ballistic resistant glass protection systems and C-Bond Secure window film application solution of $167,113, a decrease in freight and delivery revenue of $2,864, and a decrease in sale of installation and other services of $12,143.

 

Cost of Goods Sold

 

In connection with our C-Bond Solutions segment, cost of goods sold is comprised primarily of cost of raw materials and finished inventory sold, packaging costs, and warranty costs. In connection with our Mobile segment, cost of goods sold is comprised primarily of cost of raw materials such as film, labor, subcontractor costs, equipment rental, and supplies.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2022, cost of sales amounted to $954,402 as compared to $657,298 for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of $297,104, or 45.2%. This increase in cost of sales is primarily attributable to the acquisition of 80% of Mobile on July 22, 2021, which generated cost of sales of $889,016 for the year ended December 31, 2022 as compared to cost of sales of $518,700 for the period from acquisition (July 22, 2021) to December 31, 2021, an increase of $370,316. The increase was offset by a decrease in cost of sales of $70,212 related to an increase in sales of C-Bond nanoShield solution which were offset by a decrease in sales of C-Bond ballistic resistant glass protection systems and C-Bond Secure window film application solution products. Generally, we recognize a higher gross profit percentage on the sale of C-bond nanoShield and C-bond ballistic resistant glass protections systems than we do on the Mobile.

 

Gross Profit

 

For the year ended December 31, 2022, gross profit amounted to $1,278,244, or 57.3% of sales, as compared to $819,530, or 55.5% of sales, for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of $458,714, or 56.0%. This increase in gross profits is primarily attributable to the acquisition of 80% of Mobile on July 22, 2021, which generated gross profit of $863,736, or 46.6% for the year ended December 31, 2022 as compared to gross profit of $482,092, or 46.3% from acquisition date (July 22, 2021) to December 31, 2021, an increase of $381,644. Additionally, we had an increase in gross profits of $77,070, related to an increase in sales of C-Bond nanoShield solution offset be a decreased in sales of C-Bond ballistic resistant glass protection systems, C-Bond Secure window film application solution, and a decrease in sales of disinfectant products. Generally, we recognize a higher gross profit percentage on the sale of C-bond nanoShield and C-bond ballistic resistant glass protections systems than we do on the sale of disinfection products and from Mobile Tint installations and services. During the year ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, gross profits percentages related to the sale of sales of C-Bond nanoShield solution, C-Bond ballistic resistant glass protection systems, C-Bond Secure window film application solution, and disinfectant products were 86.4% and 70.9%, respectively.

 

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Operating Expenses

 

For the year ended December 31, 2022, operating expenses amounted to $4,470,738 as compared to $7,829,649 for the year ended December 31, 2021, a decrease of $3,358,911, or 42.9%. For the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, operating expenses consisted of the following:

 

   Year Ended
December 31,
 
   2022   2021 
Compensation and related benefits, including stock-based compensation charges of $1,039,943 and $4,085,868 for the years ended December 31, 2022, and 2021, respectively  $2,844,783   $6,165,006 
Research and development   -    (3,250)
Professional fees   815,542    1,031,540 
General and administrative expenses   810,413    636,353 
           
Total  $4,470,738   $7,829,649 

 

Compensation and related benefits

 

For the year ended December 31, 2022, compensation and related benefits decreased by $3,320,223, or 53.9%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2021. This decrease was primarily due to a decrease in stock-based compensation of $3,045,925 and a decrease in compensation and related benefits of $640,324 to C-Bond employees primarily attributable to a decrease in bonuses, offset by an increase in compensation and related benefits of $366,026 from the acquisition of Mobile Tint.

 

On January 6, 2022, the Board of Directors of the Company agreed to satisfy $278,654 of accrued compensation owed to its executive officers (collectively, the “Management”) as of December 31, 2021 and included in accrued compensation on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet. Management agreed to accept 278 shares of the Company’s Series B convertible preferred stock in settlement of this accrued compensation. The conversion feature of the Series B Preferred Stock at the time of issuance was determined to be beneficial on the commitment date. Because the Series B Preferred Stock was perpetual with no stated maturity date, and the conversions could occur any time from the date of issuance, the Company immediately recorded non-cash stock-based compensation of $957,556 related to the beneficial conversion feature arising from the issuance of Series B Preferred Stock. On January 18, 2021, the Board of Directors of the Company agreed to satisfy $295,000 of accrued compensation owed to its executive officers and former executive officer (collectively, the “Management”) through a Liability Reduction Plan (the “Plan”). Under this Plan, Management agreed to accept 295 shares of the Company’s Series B convertible preferred stock in settlement of accrued compensation. The conversion feature of the Series B Preferred Stock at the time of issuance was determined to be beneficial on the commitment date. Because the Series B Preferred Stock was perpetual with no stated maturity date, and the conversions could occur any time from the date of issuance, the Company immediately recorded non-cash stock-based compensation of $3,778,810 related to the beneficial conversion feature arising from the issuance of Series B Preferred Stock.

 

Research and development

 

Research and development expenses (recovery) consisted primarily of contracted development services, third party testing laboratories, materials used and allocated overhead expenses. For the year ended December 31, 2022, we did not incur any research and development fees due to a lack of working capital. For the year ended December 31, 2021, we recorded a research and development recovery of $3,250 related to a receipt of a refund of previous research and development costs of $3,250.

 

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Professional fees

 

For the year ended December 31, 2022, professional fees decreased by $215,998, or 20.9%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2021. This decrease was primarily related to a decrease in legal fees of $130,044, a decrease in consulting fee of $148,156, a decrease in investor relations fees of $24,739, and a decrease in other professional fees of $6,013, offset by an increase in accounting fees of $92,954 attributable to the acquisition of Mobile.

 

General and administrative

 

For the year ended December 31, 2022, general and administrative expenses increased by $174,060, or 27.4%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2021. This increase was primarily attributable to an increase in depreciation and amortization expense of $43,252 related to the acquisition of Mobile, an increase in rent expense of $44,699, an increase in advertising expense of $4,111, and an increase in other selling, general and administrative expenses of $117,096, offset by a decreased in bad debt expense of $31,639 and a decrease in shipping and handling expense of $3,459.

 

Loss from Operations

 

For the year ended December 31, 2022, loss from operations decreased by $3,817,625, or 54.5%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2021.

 

Other Income (Expenses), net

 

For the year ended December 31, 2022, other expense, net amounted to $1,963,984 as compared to $118,739 for the year ended December 31, 2021, an increase of $1,845,245, or 1,554.0%. This change was due to an increase in interest expense of $1,337,130 related to an increase in the amortization of debt discount, an increase in interest-bearing debt of $1,466,000, and the accrual of a default penalty of $206,250 related to convertible debt that defaulted due to non-payment, and a decrease in other income of $67,778 and an increase in loss on debt extinguishment and inducement expenses of $440,337.

 

Net Loss

 

Due to factors discussed above, for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, net loss amounted to $5,156,478 and $7,128,858, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2022, net loss attributable to common shareholders, which included a deemed dividend related to price protection, beneficial conversion features on preferred stock, and the dividends accrued on Series B and C preferred stock of $60,090 and the deduction of net loss attributable to noncontrolling interests of $38,513, amounted to $5,178,055, or $(0.02) per basic and diluted common share. For the year ended December 31, 2021, net loss attributable to common shareholders, which included a deemed dividend related to price protection, beneficial conversion features on preferred stock, and the dividends accrued on Series B and C preferred stock of $4,401,907 and the deduction of net income attributable to noncontrolling interests of $15,525, amounted to $11,546,290, or $(0.05) per basic and diluted common share.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Liquidity is the ability of an enterprise to generate adequate amounts of cash to meet its needs for cash requirements. We had cash of $97,091 and $519,898 as of December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively.

 

Our primary uses of cash have been for compensation and related benefits, fees paid to third parties for professional services, and general and administrative expenses. We have received funds from the sales of products and from various financing activities such as from the sale of our common shares, from the sale of preferred shares and from debt financings. The following trends are reasonably likely to result in changes in our liquidity over the near to long term:

 

  An increase in working capital requirements to finance our current business,

 

  Research and development fees;

 

  Addition of administrative and sales personnel needed for business growth;

 

  The cost of being a public company;

 

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  Marketing expense for building brand;

 

  Capital requirements for production capacity.
     
  Working capital requirements to support acquired companies.

 

Since inception, we have raised proceeds from the sale of common shares and preferred shares, and from debt to fund our operations and research and development initiatives.

 

On May 10, 2021, we entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (the “Loan Agreement”) and a Secured Promissory Note (the “Note”) in the amount of $500,000 with a lender. The Note shall accrue interest at 8% per annum, compounded annually, and all outstanding principal and accrued interest is due and payable of May 10, 2023. Our obligations under the Loan Agreement and the Note are secured by a second priority security interest in substantially all of the Company’s assets (the “Collateral”). The Loan Agreement and Note contain customary representations, warranties and covenants, including certain restrictions on our ability to incur additional debt or create liens on its property. The Loan Agreement and the Note also provide for certain events of default, including, among other things, payment defaults, breaches of representations and warranties and bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, the occurrence of which, after any applicable cure period, would permit Lender, among other things, to accelerate payment of all amounts outstanding under the Loan Agreement and the Note, as applicable, and to exercise its remedies with respect to the Collateral. Upon the occurrence of an Event of Default under the Loan Agreement and Note, all amounts then outstanding (including principal and interest) shall bear interest at the rate of 18% per annum, compounded annually until the Event of Default is cured. On December 31, 2022 and 2021, principal amount due under this Note amounted to $500,000.

 

On August 25, 2021, we entered into a subscription agreement with an accredited investor whereby the investor agreed to purchase 3,000 shares of the Company’s Series C Convertible Preferred Stock for $300,000, or $100.00 per share, the stated value, which was used for working capital purposes. The conversion feature of the Series C Preferred Stock at the time of issuance was determined to be beneficial on the commitment date. Because the Series C Preferred Stock was perpetual with no stated maturity date, and the conversions could occur any time from the date of issuance, the Company immediately recorded a non-cash deemed dividend of $1,509,523 related to the beneficial conversion feature arising from the issuance of Series C Preferred Stock. This non-cash deemed dividend increased the Company’s net loss attributable to common stockholders and net loss per share.

 

On October 15, 2021, we entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement (the “SPA”) with Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (the “Investor”), pursuant to which the Company received $750,000 (less $10,000 of Investor’s fees) in exchange for the issuance of a 10% Original Issue Discount Senior Convertible Promissory Note (the “Initial Note”) in the principal amount of $825,000, and a five-year warrant (the “Initial Warrant”) to purchase, in the aggregate, shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.05 per share in an amount equal to 50% of the conversion shares to be issued. The transactions contemplated under the SPA closed on October 18, 2021. Pursuant to the SPA, the Investor has agreed to purchase an additional $825,000 10% Original Issue Discount Senior Convertible Promissory Note (the “Second Note,” and together with the Initial Note, the “Notes”), and a five-year warrant (the “Second Warrant,” and together with the Initial Warrant, the “Warrants”) to purchase, in the aggregate, shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.05 per share from the Company in an amount equal to 50% of the conversion shares to be issued upon the same terms as the Initial Note and Initial Warrant (subject to there being no event of default under the Initial Note or other customary closing conditions), within three trading days of a registration statement registering the shares of the Company’s common stock issuable under the Notes (the “Conversion Shares”) and upon exercise of the Warrants (the “Warrant Shares”) being declared effective by the SEC. The Notes mature 12 months after issuance, bear interest at a rate of 4% per annum, and are initially convertible into the Company’s common stock at a fixed conversion price of $0.025 per share, subject to adjustment for stock splits, stock combinations, dilutive issuances, and similar events, as described in the Notes. On April 20, 2022, the Company and Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (the “Investor”) entered into an Exchange Agreement (the “Exchange Agreement”) that amended a 10% Original Issue Discount Senior Convertible Promissory Note (See Note 7). The original SPA remains in effect. Per the terms of the Exchange Agreement, the Parties agreed to exchange (i) the Initial Note for a new Convertible Promissory Note (the “New Note”) and (ii) the Initial Warrant for a new five-year warrant to purchase, in the aggregate, 33,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.025 per share (the “New Warrant” and together with the New Note, the “New Securities”), according to the terms and conditions of the Exchange Agreement. On April 20, 2022, pursuant to the terms of the Exchange Agreement, the Investor surrendered the Prior Securities in exchange for the New Securities. Other than the surrender of the Prior Securities, no consideration of any kind whatsoever was given by the Investor to the Company in connection with the Exchange Agreement. The terms of the New Securities are the same as the Prior Securities except for the pricing of the shares issuable under the New Note and the shares issuable upon exercise of the New Warrant. The New Securities are composed of the New Note, which is a 10% Original Issue Discount Senior Convertible Promissory Note in the principal amount of $825,000, and the New Warrant. The New Note matures on October 15, 2022, bears interest at a rate of 4% per annum, and is initially convertible into the Company’s common stock at a fixed conversion price of $0.0125 per share, subject to adjustment for stock splits, stock combinations, dilutive issuances, and similar events, as described in the New Note. The Notes may be prepaid at any time for the first 90 days at face value plus accrued interest. From day 91 through day 180, the Notes may be prepaid in an amount equal to 110% of the principal amount plus accrued interest. From day 181 through the day immediately preceding the maturity date, the Notes may be prepaid in an amount equal to 120% of the principal amount plus accrued interest. The Notes and Warrants contain conversion limitations providing that a holder thereof may not convert the Notes or exercise the Warrants to the extent (but only to the extent) that, if after giving effect to such conversion, the holder or any of its affiliates would beneficially own in excess of 4.99% of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock immediately after giving effect to such conversion or exercise. A holder may increase or decrease its beneficial ownership limitation upon notice to the Company provided that in no event such limitation exceeds 9.99%, and that any increase shall not be effective until the 61st day after such notice. In connection with the SPA, the Company entered into a Registration Rights Agreement dated October 15, 2021 (the “Registration Rights Agreement”), with the Investor pursuant to which it is obligated to file a registration statement with the SEC within 45 days after the date of the agreement to register the resale by the Investor of the conversion shares and warrant shares, and use all commercially reasonable efforts to have the registration statement declared effective by the SEC within 60 days after the registration statement is filed. Upon the occurrence of an event of default under the Notes, the Investor has the right to be prepaid at 125% of the outstanding principal balance and accrued interest, and interest accrues at 18% per annum. The Company has also granted the Investor a 12-month (or until the Notes are no longer outstanding) right to participate in specified future financings, up to a level of 30%. On October 15, 2022, the due date of the New Note, the New Note defaulted due to non-payment. Accordingly, the Company added a default penalty of $206,250, or 25%, to the principal balance and recorded interest expense of $206,250, and interest shall accrue at 18% per annum.

 

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On March 14, 2022, the Company entered into an Original Issue Discount Promissory Note and Security Agreement (the “March 2022 Note”) in the principal amount of $197,500 with Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (the “Investor”). The March 2022 Note was funded on March 14, 2022 and the Company received net proceeds of $175,000 which is net of an Original Issue Discount and investor legal fees of $22,500. The March 2022 Note matures 12 months after issuance and bears interest at a rate of 3% per annum. At any time, the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount of the March 2022 Note and any accrued and unpaid interest without penalty. The March 2022 Note also creates a lien on and grants a priority security interest in all of the Company’s assets.

 

On May 2, 2022, the Company entered into a Promissory Note (the “May 2022 Note”) in the principal amount of $250,000 with the Company’s chief executive officer. The May 2022 Note was funded in May 2022 and the Company received net proceeds of $250,000. The May 2022 Note bears interest at a rate of 6% per annum and all outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest is due on May 2, 2024. At any time, the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount of the May 2022 Note and any accrued and unpaid interest without penalty.

 

On June 23, 2022, the Company entered into entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement (“Agreement”) with GS Capital Partners, LLC (“GS Capital”), pursuant to which a Promissory Note (the “GS Capital Note”) was made to GS Capital in the aggregate principal amount of $195,000. The Note was purchased for $176,000, reflecting an original issuance discount of $19,000, and was funded on June 24, 2022 (less legal and other administrative fees). The Company received net proceeds of $148,420. The Company further issued GS Capital a total of 1,750,000 commitment shares (“Commitment Shares”) as additional consideration for the purchase of the Note (See Note 9). Principal and interest payments shall be made in 10 installments of $21,060 each beginning on the 90th-day anniversary following the issue date and continuing thereafter each 30 days for nine months. The GS Capital Note matures 12 months after issuance and bears interest at a rate of 8% per annum. GS Capital shall have the right at any time following an Event of Default to convert all or any part of the outstanding and unpaid principal, interest, penalties, and all other amounts under this Note at a conversion price of $0.011, subject to adjustment as defined in the GS Capital Note. The Company did not calculate a beneficial conversion feature since the GS Capital Note is contingently convertible upon default on the GS Capital Note. As of September 30, 2022, the Company is not in default on this note. In the event that following the Issue Date the closing trading price of the Company’s common stock is then being traded is below $0.011 per share for more than ten consecutive trading days, then the conversion price shall be equal to $0.004 per share. The GS Capital Note contains conversion limitations providing that a holder thereof may not convert the Note to the extent (but only to the extent) that, if after giving effect to such conversion, the holder or any of its affiliates would beneficially own in excess of 4.99% of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock immediately after giving effect to such conversion or exercise. A holder may increase or decrease its beneficial ownership limitation upon notice to the Company provided that in no event such limitation exceeds 9.99%, and that any increase shall not be effective until the 61st day after such notice. Events of default include, amongst other items, failure to pay principal or interest, bankruptcy, delisting of the Company’s stock, financial statement restatements, or if the Company effectuates a reverse split. Upon the occurrence of any event of default, the GS Capital Note shall become immediately and automatically due and payable and the Company shall pay to GS Capital, in full satisfaction of its obligations hereunder, an amount equal to: (a) the then outstanding principal amount of this note plus (b) accrued and unpaid interest on the unpaid principal amount of this note to the date of payment (the “mandatory prepayment date”) plus (y) default interest, if any, multiplied by 120%. On December 15, 2022, the Company and GS Capital entered into a letter agreement to extend the due date of the GS Capital June 2022 note by 60 days. Specifically, the maturity date of the GS Capital June 2022 note was extended to August 23, 2023 and the next payment due date was extended to February 28, 2023. Through December 31, 2022, the Company paid $53,512 of principal balance. On December 31, 2022, the principal balance due on the GS Capital Note amounted to $141,488 and accrued interest payable amounted to $7,471.

 

On July 26, 2022, the Company closed a Securities Purchase Agreement (“July 2022 Agreement”) with GS Capital, pursuant to which a Promissory Note (“July 2022 Note”) was made to GS Capital in the aggregate principal amount of $195,000. The July 2022 Note was purchased for $176,000, reflecting an original issuance discount of $19,000, and was funded on July 28, 2022 (less legal and other administrative fees). The Company received net proceeds of $158,920. The Company further issued GS Capital a total of 2,600,000 commitment shares (“July 2022 Commitment Shares”) as additional consideration for the purchase of the July 2022 Note. In addition, the Company issued 998,008 of its common stock to the placement agent as fee for the capital raise, respectively. The July Commitment Shares and the placement agent shares were recorded as a debt discount of $34,606 based on the relative fair value method to be amortized over the life of the Note. Principal and interest payments shall be made in 10 installments of $21,060 each beginning on the 90th-day anniversary following the issue date and continuing thereafter each 30 days for nine months. The July 2022 Note matures 12 months after issuance and bears interest at a rate of 8% per annum. GS Capital shall have the right at any time following an Event of Default to convert all or any part of the outstanding and unpaid principal, interest, penalties, and all other amounts under the July 2022 Note at a conversion price of $0.011, subject to adjustment as defined in the Note. The Company did not calculate a beneficial conversion feature since the GS Capital July 2022 Note is contingently convertible upon a default on the July 2022 Note. As of September 30, 2022, the Company is not in default on this note. In the event that following the Issue Date the closing trading price of the Company’s common stock is then being traded is below $0.011 per share for more than ten consecutive trading days, then the conversion price shall be equal to $0.004 per share. The July 2022 Note contains conversion limitations providing that a holder thereof may not convert the Note to the extent (but only to the extent) that, if after giving effect to such conversion, the holder or any of its affiliates would beneficially own in excess of 4.99% of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock immediately after giving effect to such conversion or exercise. A holder may increase or decrease its beneficial ownership limitation upon notice to the Company provided that in no event such limitation exceeds 9.99%, and that any increase shall not be effective until the 61st day after such notice. . On December 15, 2022, the Company and GS Capital entered into a letter agreement to extend the due date of the GS Capital July 2022 note by 60 days. Specifically, the maturity date of the GS Capital July 2022 note was extended to September 26, 2023 and the next payment due date was extended to February 28, 2023. Through December 31, 2022, the Company paid $34,120 of principal balance. On December 31, 2022, the principal balance due on the GS Capital July 2022 Note amounted to $160,880 and accrued interest payable amounted to $6,441.

 

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On September 6, 2022, the Company closed a Securities Purchase Agreement (“September 2022 Agreement”) with GS Capital, pursuant to which a Promissory Note (“September 2022 Note”) was made to GS Capital in the aggregate principal amount of $195,000. The September 2022 Note was purchased for $176,000, reflecting an original issuance discount of $19,000, and was funded on September 6, 2022 (less legal and other administrative fees). The Company received net proceeds of $158,920. The Company further issued GS Capital a total of 3,300,000 commitment shares (“September 2022 Commitment Shares”) as additional consideration for the purchase of the September 2022 Note. In addition, the Company issued 773,626 of its common stock to the placement agent as fee for the capital raise, respectively. The September Commitment Shares and the placement agent shares were recorded as a debt discount of $30,326 based on the relative fair value method to be amortized over the life of the Note. Principal and interest payments shall be made in 9 installments of $23,400 each beginning on the 120th-day anniversary following the issue date and continuing thereafter each 30 days for eight months. The September 2022 Note matures 12 months after issuance and bears interest at a rate of 8% per annum. GS Capital shall have the right at any time following an Event of Default to convert all or any part of the outstanding and unpaid principal, interest, penalties, and all other amounts under the September 2022 Note at a conversion price of $0.009, subject to adjustment as defined in the Note. The Company did not calculate a beneficial conversion feature since the GS Capital July 2022 Note is contingently convertible upon a default on the September 2022 Note. As of September 30, 2022, the Company is not in default on this note. In the event that following the Issue Date the closing trading price of the Company’s common stock is then being traded is below $0.009 per share for more than ten consecutive trading days, then the conversion price shall be equal to $0.0032 per share. The September 2022 Note contains conversion limitations providing that a holder thereof may not convert the Note to the extent (but only to the extent) that, if after giving effect to such conversion, the holder or any of its affiliates would beneficially own in excess of 4.99% of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock immediately after giving effect to such conversion or exercise. A holder may increase or decrease its beneficial ownership limitation upon notice to the Company provided that in no event such limitation exceeds 9.99%, and that any increase shall not be effective until the 61st day after such notice. On December 15, 2022, the Company and GS Capital entered into a letter agreement to extend the due date of the GS Capital September 2022 note by 60 days. Specifically, the maturity date of the GS Capital September 2022 note was extended to November 6, 2023 and the next payment due date was extended to March 6, 2023. On December 31, 2022, the principal balance due on the GS Capital September 2022 Note amounted to $195,000 and accrued interest payable amounted to $5,001.

 

On November 8, 2022, the Company entered into a Promissory Note (the “November 2022 Note”) with a private investor (the “Private Investor”) in the principal amount of $200,000 and received net proceeds of $200,000. The November 2022 Note bears interest at a rate of 8% per annum and all outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest is due on November 8, 2024. At any time, the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount of the November 2022 Note and any accrued and unpaid interest without penalty. As security for payment of the principal and interest on the November 2022 Note, the Company and the Private Investor previously entered into that certain Loan and Security Agreement dated May 10, 2021, which is incorporated into the November 2022 Note. On December 31, 2022, the principal balance due on the November 2022 Note amounted to $200,000 and accrued interest payable amounted to $2,367. 

 

On November 9, 2022, the Company closed a Securities Purchase Agreement dated November 4, 2022, with 1800 DIAGONAL LENDING LLC, a Virginia limited liability company, (“Diagonal”), pursuant to which a Promissory Note (the “November 2022 Diagonal Note”) dated November 4, 2022, was made to Diagonal in the aggregate principal amount of $104,250 and the Company received net proceeds of $100,000 which was net of fees of $4,250. The November 2022 Diagonal Note bears interest at a rate of 12% per annum (22% upon the occurrence of an event of a default) and all outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest are due on May 4, 2024. On December 27, 2022, the Company closed a Securities Purchase Agreement dated December 27, 2022, with 1800 Diagonal pursuant to which a Promissory Note (“December 2022 Diagonal Note”) dated December 27, 2022, was made to Diagonal in the aggregate principal amount of $64,250 and the Company received net proceeds of $60,000 which was net of fees of $4,250. The December 2022 Diagonal Note bears interest at a rate of 12% per annum (22% upon the occurrence of an event of a default) and all outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest are due on June 27, 2024. The Company has the right to prepay the November 2022 and December 2022 Diagonal Notes (principal and accrued interest) at any time during the first six months the note is outstanding at the rate of 115% during the first 30 days after issuance, 120% during the 31st to 60th day after issuance, and 125% during the 61st to the 180th day after issuance. The November 2022 and December 2022 Diagonal Notes may not be prepaid after the 180th day following the issuance date, unless Diagonal agrees to such repayment and such terms. Diagonal may in its option, at any time beginning 180 days after the date of the Diagonal Notes, convert the outstanding principal and interest on the November 2022 and December 2022 Diagonal Notes into shares of our common stock at a conversion price per share equal to 65% of the average of the three lowest closing bid prices of our common stock during the 10 trading days prior to the date of conversion. At no time may the November 2022 and December 2022 Diagonal Notes be converted into shares of our common stock if such conversion would result in Diagonal and its affiliates owning an aggregate of in excess of 4.99% of the then outstanding shares of our common stock.

 

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On November 22, 2022, the Company entered into a Promissory Note and Security Agreement (the “November 2022 Note”) in the principal amount of $65,000 with Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (the “Investor”). The November 2022 Note was funded on November 22, 2022 and the Company received net proceeds of $62,500 which is net of investor legal fees of $2,500. The legal fees were recorded as a debt discount to be amortized over the life of the November 2022 note. The November 2022 Note matures on August 22, 2023 and bears interest at a rate of 8% per annum. At any time, the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount of the November 2022 Note and any accrued and unpaid interest without penalty.

 

Additional cash liquidity is generated from product sales. However, to date, we are not profitable, and we cannot provide any assurances that we will be profitable. We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents will not be sufficient to fund our current operating plans.

 

Cash Flows

 

For the Years Ended December 31, 2022 and 2021

 

The following table shows a summary of our cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021.

 

   Year Ended
December 31,
 
   2022   2021 
Net cash used in operating activities  $(1,584,918)  $(1,807,051)
Net cash provided by investing activities  $5,500   $301,901 
Net cash provided by financing activities  $1,156,611   $1,701,641 
Net (decrease) increase in cash  $(422,807)  $196,491 
Cash - beginning of the year  $519,898   $323,407 
Cash - end of the year  $97,091   $519,898 

 

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities:

 

Net cash flow used in operating activities was $1,584,918 for the year ended December 31, 2022 as compared to net cash flow used in operating activities of $1,807,051 for the year ended December 31, 2021, a decrease of $222,133.

 

Net cash flow used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2022 primarily reflected a net loss of $5,156,478, which was then adjusted for the add-back (deduction) of non-cash items primarily consisting of depreciation and amortization of $89,219, stock-based compensation expense of $1,039,943, stock-based professional fees of $298,571, amortization of debt discount of $1,059,752, non-cash interest expense for default penalty and put premiums of $296,981, bad debt expense of $7,716, gain on sale of property and equipment of $(5,500), and a non-cash loss on debt extinguishment of $343,895, and changes in operating assets and liabilities consisting primarily of an increase in accounts receivable of $100,160, a decrease in inventory of $5,485, an increase in prepaid expenses of $746, a decrease in contract assets of $82,526, a decrease in accounts payable of $49,709, an increase in accrued expenses of $299,660, an increase in contract liabilities of $12,211, an increase in accrued compensation of $180,609, and an increase in accrued interest – related party of $10,027.

 

Net cash flow used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2021 primarily reflected a net loss of $7,128,858, which was then adjusted for the add-back (deduction) of non-cash items primarily consisting of depreciation and amortization of $45,967, stock-based compensation expense of $4,085,868, stock-based professional fees of $478,129, amortization of debt discount of $171,875, bad debt expense of $39,355, allowance for obsolete inventory of $45,000, gain on sale of property and equipment of $(13,000), and a non-cash gain on debt extinguishment of $(96,442), and changes in operating assets and liabilities consisting primarily of an increase in accounts receivable of $73,180, a decrease in inventory of $17,288, an increase in prepaid expenses of $13,211, an increase in contract assets of $50,106, an increase in accounts payable of $88,853, an increase in accrued expenses of $92,148, an increase in accrued compensation of $601,431, and a decrease in customer deposits of $110,000.

 

Net Cash Provided by Investing Activities:

 

During the year ended December 31, 2022, we received proceeds of $5,500 from the sale of property and equipment.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2021, we received proceeds of $288,901 in connection with the acquisition of Mobile and $13,000 from the sale of property and equipment.

 

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Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities:

  

Net cash provided by financing activities was $1,156,611 for the year ended December 31, 2022 as compared to $1,701,641 for the year ended December 31, 2021.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2022, we received net proceeds from notes payable of $903,760, received proceeds from a related party note payable of $250,000, and received net proceeds from convertible notes payable of $160,000. These proceeds were offset by the repayment of notes payable of $157,149.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2021, we received net proceeds from the sale of Series C preferred stock of $550,000, net proceeds from a loan of $500,000, and net proceeds from convertible notes payable of $680,000. These proceeds were offset by the repayment of notes payable of $28,359.

 

Funding Requirements

 

We expect the primary use of capital to continue to be salaries, legal, accounting and regulatory expenses and general overhead costs including sales and marketing. Additional uses of capital will include additional headcount, tools and equipment, capacity expansion and operational control software. We believe current cash and cash equivalents will not be sufficient to meet anticipated cash requirements. Additional capital will be required to further research new product verticals and enhancements to current product offerings based on customer requirements.

 

As of December 31, 2022, we determined that there was substantial doubt about our ability to maintain operations as a going concern. Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. Management cannot provide assurance that we will ultimately achieve profitable operations or become cash flow positive or raise additional debt and/or equity capital. We will seek to raise capital through additional debt and/or equity financings to fund operations in the future. Although we have historically raised capital from sales of common and preferred shares, from the issuance of notes payable, and from the issuance of convertible promissory notes, there is no assurance that it will be able to continue to do so. If we are unable to raise additional capital or secure additional lending in the near future, management expects that the Company will need to curtail its operations. Our consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Our forecast of the period of time through which our financial resources will be adequate to support our operations is a forward-looking statement that involves risks and uncertainties, and actual results could vary materially because of a number of factors. We have based this estimate on assumptions that may prove to be wrong and could utilize our available capital resources sooner than we currently expect. Our capital requirements are difficult to forecast. Please see the section titled “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional risks associated with our capital requirements.

 

Until such time as we generate substantial product revenue to offset operational expenses, we expect to finance our cash needs through a combination of public and private equity offerings and debt financings. We may be unable to raise capital or enter into such other arrangements when needed or on favorable terms or at all. Our failure to raise capital or enter into such other arrangements as and when needed would have a negative impact on our financial condition.

 

Contractual Obligations and Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

Contractual Obligations

 

We have certain fixed contractual obligations and commitments that include future estimated payments. Changes in our business needs, cancellation provisions, changing interest rates, and other factors may result in actual payments differing from the estimates. We cannot provide certainty regarding the timing and amounts of payments. We have presented below a summary of the most significant assumptions used in our determination of amounts presented in the tables, to assist in the review of this information within the context of our consolidated financial position, results of operations, and cash flows.

 

26

 

 

The following tables summarize our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2022, and the effect these obligations are expected to have on our liquidity and cash flows in future periods.

 

   Payments Due by Period 
Contractual obligations:  Total   Less than
1 year
   1-2 years   3-5 years   5 + years 
Notes payable  $1,918,203   $1,709,399   $208,804   $-   $- 
Convertible note payable   1,199,750    1,031,250    168,500    -    - 
Interest on notes payable   477,734    477,734    -    -    - 
Operating lease gross base rent   436,259    147,466    249,593    39,200    - 
Total  $4,031,946   $3,365,849   $626,897   $39,200   $- 

 

We enter into agreements in the normal course of business with contracted research and testing organization, product distribution and material vendors which are payable or cancelable at any time with 30-day prior written approval.

 

Off-balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements during the period presented as defined in the rules and regulations of the SEC.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

Our consolidated financial statements, together with the related notes and report of independent registered public accounting firm, are set forth on the pages indicated in Item 15, Part IV of this Report.

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Disclosure controls and procedures

 

We maintain “disclosure controls and procedures,” as that term is defined in Rule 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e), promulgated by the SEC pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Disclosure controls and procedures include controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our company’s reports filed under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our management, with the participation of our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, evaluated our company’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K. Based on this evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that as of December 31, 2022, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective. The ineffectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures was due to material weaknesses, which we identified, in our report on internal control over financial reporting.

 

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Internal control over financial reporting

 

Management’s annual report on internal control over financial reporting

 

Our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, are responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act). Our management, with the participation of our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2022. Our management’s evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting was based on the 2013 framework in Internal Control-Integrated Framework, issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this evaluation, our management concluded that as of December 31, 2022, our internal control over financial reporting was not effective.

 

The ineffectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures was due to the following material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting: (1) the lack of multiples levels of management review on complex business, accounting and financial reporting issues, and (2) a lack of adequate segregation of duties as a result of our limited financial resources to support hiring of personnel.

 

Until such time as we expand our staff to include additional accounting and executive personnel, it is likely we will continue to report material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting.

 

A material weakness is a deficiency or a combination of control deficiencies in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

Limitations on Effectiveness of Controls

 

Internal control over financial reporting cannot provide absolute assurance of achieving financial reporting objectives because of its inherent limitations. Internal control over financial reporting is a process that involves human diligence and compliance and is subject to lapses in judgment and breakdowns resulting from human failures. Internal control over financial reporting can also be circumvented by collusion or improper management override. Because of such limitations, there is a risk that material misstatements may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis by internal control over financial reporting. However, these inherent limitations are known features of the financial reporting process. Therefore, it is possible to design into the process safeguards to reduce, though not eliminate, this risk.

 

Changes in internal control over financial reporting

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the fourth quarter of our fiscal year ended December 31, 2022 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

ITEM 9C. DISCLOSURE REGARDING FOREIGN JURISDICTIONS THAT PREVENT INSPECTIONS

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

The following table sets forth certain information regarding our current directors and executive officers:

 

Name   Age   Position
Scott R. Silverman   58   Chief Executive Officer, Interim Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Chairman of the Board and Director
Allison Tomek   47   President, Vice President of Corporate Communication, Secretary and Director
Barry M. Edelstein   58   Director

 

Scott R. Silverman has been the Chairman of the Board and a director of the Company since June 1, 2018. Mr. Silverman has served as Chief Executive Officer of C-Bond Systems, LLC since December 2017 and Interim Chief Financial Officer since March 8, 2021.  From 2003 to 2011, Mr. Silverman served as Executive Chairman of VeriChip Corporation which completed an initial public offering on the NASDAQ in 2007 raising more than $30 million. VeriChip Corporation subsequently sold to Stanley Works in 2008.  From 2011 to 2016, Mr. Silverman founded and served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Veriteq Corporation, a leader in RFID technology for medical devices which went public in 2013 and was subsequently sold to a leading breast implant manufacturer. Mr. Silverman is a graduate from the University of Pennsylvania and Villanova University School of Law. We believe that Mr. Silverman’s knowledge of our company, industry and business makes him well-suited to serve on the board of directors.

 

Allison Tomek has served as Vice President of Corporate Communications and Corporate Secretary since April 2018, and as President and Director since March 8, 2021. She was previously Senior Vice President Investor Relations at PositiveID Corporation from 2007 to 2018, as well as Vice President of Investor Relations at Veriteq Corporation from 2011 to 2015. She served as the director of investor relations and corporate communications at Andrx Corporation at the time of its acquisition by Watson Pharmaceuticals in 2006 for $1.9 billion. She is a former two-time President of the National Investor Relations Institute, South Florida chapter. She holds a B.S. in News/Editorial from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Colorado, Boulder. We believe that Ms. Tomek’s knowledge of our company, regulations, and business makes her well-suited to serve on the board of directors.

 

Barry M. Edelstein has been a director on the Board of the Company since June 1, 2018. Since June 2008, Mr. Edelstein has served as a Managing Partner of Structured Growth Capital, Inc., which provides monetization financing to non-investment grade entities.  Since January 2002, Mr. Edelstein has also served as President and CEO of ScentSational Technologies, LLC, a leader in developing, patenting and licensing Olfaction Packaging technologies to food, beverage and other consumer products companies. Mr. Edelstein has a JD from the Widener University School of Law and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Marketing from Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business.  Mr. Edelstein brings a wealth of operational and financial experience to our board as well as a deep knowledge of the packaging industry.

  

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Terms of Office

 

All directors will hold office until the next annual meeting of stockholders or until their successors have been elected and qualified or appointed, unless sooner displaced.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships between or among any of our directors or executive officers.

 

Director Independence

 

The Company’s securities are not listed on a national securities exchange, or an inter-dealer quotation system which has requirements that a majority of the board of directors be independent No member of the Board of Directors other than Mr. Edelstein is independent, as that term is defined in the listing standards of The Nasdaq Stock Market. 

 

Board Meetings; Annual Meeting Attendance

 

During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022, the Board held three board meetings in person and via teleconference and acted via unanimous written consent on 9 occasions. The Company did not hold an annual meeting.

 

Holders of our securities can send communications to the Board via mail or telephone to the Secretary at the Company’s principal executive offices. The Company has not yet established a policy with respect to our directors’ attendance at the annual meetings. A stockholder who wishes to communicate with the Board may do so by directing a written request addressed to our Corporate Secretary at the address appearing on the first page of this Information Statement.

 

Committees of the Board of Directors

 

As our Common Stock is not presently listed for trading on a national securities exchange, we are not required to have board committees. However, the Company has an audit committee which is comprised of Mr. Edelstein, an independent director.

 

Code of Business Conduct and Ethics

 

On March 12, 2019, we adopted a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that applies to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, or persons performing similar functions in that our officers and directors serve in these capacities. A copy of the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is available, without charge, on our website at http://cbondsystems.com/. We intend to satisfy the disclosure requirements of Form 8-K regarding any amendment to, or a waiver from, any provision of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics by posting such amendment or waiver on our website.

 

Board Leadership Structure and Role in Risk Oversight

 

Currently, the Board is comprised of three directors: Scott Silverman, Allison Tomek and Barry Edelstein, with Scott Silverman serving as our Chairman. Scott Silverman is also our Chief Executive Officer.

 

The Board recognizes that the leadership structure and combination or separation of the Chief Executive Officer and Chairman roles is driven by the needs of the Company at any point in time. We have no policy requiring combination or separation of these leadership roles and our governing documents do not mandate a particular structure. This has allowed the Board the flexibility to establish the most appropriate structure for the Company at any given time.

 

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ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

The following summarizes the compensation earned by our executive officers named in the “Summary Compensation Table” below (referred to herein as our “named executive officers”) in the fiscal years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021.

 

This section also discusses the material elements of our executive compensation policies and decisions and important factors relevant to an analysis of these policies and decisions. It provides qualitative information regarding the manner and context in which compensation is awarded to and earned by our named executive officers and is intended to place in perspective the information presented in the following tables and the corresponding narrative.

 

Overview

 

Our named executive officers for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, are as follows:

 

  Scott R. Silverman – Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer;
     
  Allison Tomek – President, Vice President of Corporate Communication and Secretary since March 8, 2021;

 

2022 Summary Compensation Table

 

The following table sets forth information regarding compensation awarded to, earned by or paid to each of the named executive officers for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021.

 

Name and Principal Position  Year  

Salary

($)

   Bonus
($) (1)
  

Stock

Awards

($) (2)

  

Option
Awards

($)

  

All Other
Compensation

($)

  

Total

($)

 
Scott R. Silverman   2022    450,211(3)   155,469    -    -    681,740(4)(8)   1,287,420 
Chief Executive Officer, Interim Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer   2021    409,283(3)   483,415    -    -    2,309,736(5)(8)   3,202,434 
                                    
Allison Tomek   2022    180,000(3)   70,219    -    -    279,000(6)   529,219 
President, Vice President of Corporate Communications, Secretary   2021    158,090(3)   137,700    132,000(7)   -    256,190(6)   683,980 

 

(1)

Cash bonuses earned by Mr. Silverman and Ms. Tomek in 2022 were based on a bonus approved by the Board of Directors in December 2022 and also included bonuses accrued or paid based on a percentage of capital raises, in accordance with Mr. Silverman’s employment agreement. Cash bonuses were earned by Mr. Silverman and Ms. Tomek in 2021 based on a bonus approved by the Board of Directors during 2021 and also included bonuses accrued or paid based on a percentage of capital raises, in accordance with Mr. Silverman’s employment agreement. In connection with the December 2022 and 2021 bonus, the bonus recipients and the Company agreed to pay 90% of the 2022 and 2021 year-end bonus in Series B preferred stock rather than cash.

 

(2)

As required by SEC rules, the amounts in this column reflect the grant date or modification date fair value as required by FASB ASC Topic 718. A discussion of the assumptions and methodologies used to calculate these amounts, are contained in the notes to our financial statements under “Note 10 – Shareholders’ Deficit”.

 

(3) Includes accrued and unpaid deferred compensation.

 

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(4)

On January 6, 2022, Mr. Silverman’s Series B preferred share issuance included non-cash compensation of $678,556 related to the conversion of accrued compensation to convertible Series B preferred shares. The conversion feature of the Series B Preferred Stock at the time of issuance was determined to be beneficial on the issue date. Because the Series B Preferred Stock was perpetual with no stated maturity date, and the conversions could occur any time from the date of issuance, during the year ended December 31, 2022, the Company immediately recorded non-cash stock-based compensation of $678,556 related to the beneficial conversion feature arising from the issuance of Series B Preferred Stock which is included in Stock Awards. 

   
(5)

In 2021, in lieu of cash compensation, Mr. Silverman received 180 shares of series B preferred shares for unpaid and deferred compensation and a bonus of $180,000. In 2021, Mr. Silverman’s series B preferred share issuance included non-cash compensation of $2,305,714 related to the conversion of accrued compensation to convertible Series B preferred shares. The conversion feature of the Series B Preferred Stock at the time of issuance was determined to be beneficial on the issue date. Because the Series B Preferred Stock was perpetual with no stated maturity date, and the conversions could occur any time from the date of issuance, during the year ended December 31, 2021, the Company immediately recorded non-cash stock-based compensation of $2,305,714 related to the beneficial conversion feature arising from the issuance of Series B Preferred Stock which is included in Stock Awards. 

   
(6)

In 2022, in lieu of cash compensation, Ms. Tomek received 81 shares of series B preferred shares for unpaid and deferred compensation. In 2022, Ms. Tomek’s series B preferred share issuance included non-cash compensation of $279,000 related to the conversion of accrued compensation to convertible Series B preferred shares. The conversion feature of the Series B Preferred Stock at the time of issuance was determined to be beneficial on the issue date. Because the Series B Preferred Stock was perpetual with no stated maturity date, and the conversions could occur any time from the date of issuance, during the year ended December 31, 2022, the Company immediately recorded non-cash stock-based compensation of $279,000 related to the beneficial conversion feature arising from the issuance of Series B Preferred Stock which is included in Stock Awards. In 2021, in lieu of cash compensation, Ms. Tomek received 20 shares of series B preferred shares for unpaid and deferred compensation and bonus of $20,000. In 2021, Ms. Tomek’s series B preferred share issuance included non-cash compensation of $256,190 related to the conversion of accrued compensation to convertible Series B preferred shares. The conversion feature of the Series B Preferred Stock at the time of issuance was determined to be beneficial on the issue date. Because the Series B Preferred Stock was perpetual with no stated maturity date, and the conversions could occur any time from the date of issuance, during the year ended December 31, 2021, the Company immediately recorded non-cash stock-based compensation of $256,190 related to the beneficial conversion feature arising from the issuance of Series B Preferred Stock which is included in Stock Awards. 

   
(7)

In 2021, stock awards include the issuance of 2,000,000 shares of restricted common stock to Ms. Tomek with a fair value of $132,000. 

   
(8) Includes reimbursement of medical expenses of $3,184 and $4,022 in 2022 and 2021, respectively.

 

Narrative Disclosure to Summary Compensation Table

 

Except as otherwise described below, there are no compensatory plans or arrangements, including payments to be received from the Company with respect to any named executive officer, that would result in payments to such person because of his or her resignation, retirement or other termination of employment with the Company, or our subsidiaries, any change in control, or a change in the person’s responsibilities following a change in control of the Company.

  

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Employment Agreement with Executive Officer

 

Employment Agreement with Scott R. Silverman

 

We entered into an employment agreement with Mr. Silverman on October 18, 2017, pursuant to which he serves as our Chief Executive Officer for an initial term of three years that extends for successive one-year renewal terms unless either party gives 30-days’ advance notice of non-renewal. As consideration for these services, the employment agreement provides Mr. Silverman with the following compensation and benefits:

 

  An annual base salary of $300,000, with a 10% increase on each anniversary date contingent upon achieving certain performance objectives as set by the Board.

 

  When the first $500,000 of equity investments was raised by the Company after entering into this employment agreement, Mr. Silverman receives a capital raise success bonus of 5% of all equity capital raised from investors/lenders introduced by him to the Company.

 

  Annual cash performance bonus opportunity as determined by the Board.

 

  An option to acquire 3,000,000 common shares of the Company, with a strike price of $0.31 per share. These options vested pro rata on a monthly basis for the term of the employment agreement. On each anniversary, Mr. Silverman will be eligible to be granted a minimum of 500,000 stock options of the Company at a strike price of $0.85 per common share contingent upon the achievement of certain performance objectives.

 

  Certain other employee benefits and perquisites, including reimbursement of necessary and reasonable travel and participation in retirement and welfare benefits.

 

Mr. Silverman’s employment agreement provides that, in the event that his employment is terminated by the Company without “cause” (as defined in his employment agreement), or if Mr. Silverman resigned for “good reasons” (as defined in his employment agreement), subject to a complete release of claims, he will be entitled to (i) retain all stock options previously granted; and (ii) receive any benefits then owed or accrued along with one year of base salary and any unreimbursed expenses incurred by him. All amounts shall be paid on the termination date. In the event that Mr. Silverman’s employment is terminated by the Company for “cause” (as defined in his employment agreement), or if Mr. Silverman resigned without “good reasons” (as defined in his employment agreement), subject to a complete release of claims, he will be entitled to receive any unpaid base salary and benefits then owed or accrued and any unreimbursed expenses incurred by him. Additionally, if a change of control (as defined in his employment agreement) occurs during the term of this agreement, all unvested stock options will vest in full, and Mr. Silverman shall be paid a bonus equal to three times his current minimum base salary and minimum target bonus. 

 

Pursuant to the employment agreement, Mr. Silverman is subject to a confidentiality covenant, a two-year post-termination non-competition covenant and a two-year post-termination non-solicitation covenant. On June 30, 2020, the Company amended the employment agreement of Mr. Silverman to provide for successive one-year extensions until either the executive or the Board of Directors of the Company gives notice to terminate the employment agreement per its terms. This employment agreement amendment also included an allowance of up to $10,000 per year to cover uncovered medical/dental expenses for Mr. Silverman and his family.

 

Elements of Executive Compensation

 

Base Salaries. Base salaries for the named executive officers during 2022 and 2021 were determined, subject in each case to their employment agreements, on the scope of each officer’s responsibilities along with his or her respective experience and contributions during the prior year. When reviewing base salaries, our board of directors took factors into account such as each officer’s experience and individual performance, company performance as a whole, and general industry conditions, but did not assign any specific weighting to any factor.

 

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Equity Awards. Equity awards granted by the board of directors to the named executive officers during 2022 and 2021 were determined based on their employment agreements, on the scope of each officer’s responsibilities along with his or her respective experience and contributions during the prior year. When reviewing equity awards, our board of directors took factors into account such as each officer’s experience and individual performance, company performance as a whole, and general industry conditions, but did not assign any specific weighting to any factor. 

 

Capital Raise Success Bonus. Pursuant to Mr. Silverman’s employment agreement, he receives a capital raise success bonus of 5% of all equity capital raised from investors/lenders introduced by him to the Company. Mr. Silverman agreed to share this capital raise bonus with other executives.

 

Bonus. In January 2021, the board of directors approved a bonus to Mr. Silverman and Ms. Tomek of $200,000 and $25,000, respectively. In December 2021, the board of directors approved a bonus to Mr. Silverman and Ms. Tomek of $219,615 and $90,500, respectively. In December 2022, the board of directors approved a bonus to Mr. Silverman and Ms. Tomek of $100,000 and $60,000, respectively.

 

Other Benefits. On June 30, 2020, we amended the employment agreement of Mr. Silverman to include an allowance of up to $10,000 per year to cover uncovered medical/dental expenses for Mr. Silverman and his family. Currently, we do not offer any additional benefit packages to other employees.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

 

The following are the outstanding equity awards for the named executive officers as of December 31, 2022:

 

   Option Awards   
Name  Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options
(Exercisable)
  Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options
(Unexercisable)
   Equity Incentive
Plan Awards:
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised Unearned Options
  

Option
Exercise
Price

($)(1)

   Option
Expiration
Date
Scott R. Silverman  3,000,000(2)       -         0   $0.31   10/18/2027

 

(1) This reflects the exercise price of such options.
   
(2) These shares were fully vested prior to 2021.

  

   Stock Awards 
Name  Number of Shares or Units of Stock That Have Not Vested
(#)
  

Market Value of Shares or Units of Stock That Have Not Vested

($)(*)

  

Equity Incentive Plan Awards: Number of Unearned Shares, Units or Other Rights That Have Not Vested

(#)

   Equity Incentive Plan Awards: Market or Payout Value of Unearned Shares, Units or Other Rights That Have Not Vested
($)
 
Scott R. Silverman (1)   6,970,120   $57,155    6,970,120   $57,155 
Allison Tomek (2)   4,750,000   $38,950    4,750,000   $38,950 

 

* The market value of shares of stock is computed by multiplying the closing market price of our stock at the end of the last completed fiscal year of December 31, 2022 of $0.0082 by the number of shares of stock set forth to the left of such figure.

 

(1) 6,970,120 shares vest on May 1, 2023, as extended by agreement. As of December 31, 2022, Mr. Silverman also owns 655 shares of Series B Preferred stock, which may convert into approximately 107,761,859 common shares.
   
(2) 4,750,000 shares vest on May 1, 2023, as extended per agreement. As of December 31, 2022, Ms. Tomek also owns 146 shares of Series B Preferred stock, which may convert into approximately 23,842,222 common shares.

 

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C-Bond Systems, Inc. 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan

 

On June 7, 2018, our Board of Directors and our stockholders approved the C-Bond Systems, Inc. 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan (the “2018 Plan”), which became effective on August 2, 2018. The purposes of the 2018 Plan is to advance the interests of the Company, its affiliates and its stockholders and promote the long-term growth of the Company by providing employees, non-employee Directors and third-party service providers with incentives to maximize stockholder value and to otherwise contribute to the success of the Company and its affiliates, thereby aligning the interests of such individuals with the interests of the Company’s stockholders and providing them additional incentives to continue in their employment or affiliation with the Company.

 

Summary of the Plan

 

Administration

 

The 2018 Plan will be administered by a committee designated by the Board of Directors (the “Committee”) or, in the absence of the Committee or in the case of awards issued to non-employee Directors, the 2018 Plan will be administered by the Board of Directors (as applicable, the “Administrator”). The Administrator also has full and exclusive power and authority to administer the 2018 Plan.  In administering awards under our 2018 Plan, the Administrator, has the power, subject to the terms of the 2018 Plan, to determine the terms of the awards granted under our 2018 Plan, including any applicable exercise or grant price, the number of shares subject to each award and the exercisability of the awards.  The Administrator also has full power to determine the persons to whom and the time or times at which awards will be made and to make all other determinations and take all other actions advisable for the administration of the 2018 Plan.

 

On a calendar year basis, the Board of Directors may, by resolution, delegate to the Chief Executive Officer of the Company the limited authority to grant awards under the 2018 Plan during such calendar year to designated classes of employees, who are not officers of the Company or any affiliate and subject to the provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act, and to service providers.

 

Types of Awards

 

Under our 2018 Plan, the Administrator may grant:

 

  options to acquire our Common Stock, both incentive stock options that are intended to satisfy the requirements of Section 422 of the Internal Revenue Code and nonqualified stock options which are not intended to satisfy such requirements. The exercise price of options granted under our 2018 Plan must at least be equal to the fair market value of our Common Stock on the date of grant and the term of an option may not exceed ten years, except that with respect to an incentive stock option granted to any employee who owns more than 10% of the voting power of all classes of our outstanding stock as of the grant date the term must not exceed five years and the exercise price must equal at least 110% of the fair market value on the grant date.

 

  stock appreciation rights, or SARs, which allow the recipient to receive the appreciation in the fair market value of our Common Stock between the date of grant and the exercise date. The amount payable under the stock appreciation right may be paid in cash or with shares of our Common Stock, or a combination thereof, as determined by the Administrator.
     
  restricted stock awards, which are awards of our shares of Common Stock that vest in accordance with terms and conditions established by the Administrator.
     
  restricted stock units, which are awards that are based on the value of our Common Stock and may be paid in cash or in shares of our Common Stock.
     
  other types of stock-based or stock-related awards not otherwise described by the terms and provision of the 2018 Plan, including the grant or offer for sale of unrestricted shares of the Company’s Common Stock, and which may involve the transfer of actual shares of the Company’s Common Stock or payment in cash or otherwise of amounts based on the value of shares of our Common Stock and may be designed to comply with or take advantage of the applicable local laws of jurisdictions other than the United States.
     
  other cash-based awards to eligible persons in such amounts and upon such terms as the Administrator shall determine.

 

An award granted under the 2018 Plan must include a minimum vesting period of at least one year, provided, however, that an award may provide that the award will vest before the completion of such one-year period upon the death or qualifying disability of the grantee of the award or a change of control of the Company and awards covering, in the aggregate, 25,000,000 shares of our Common Stock may be issued without any minimum vesting period.

 

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Shares Authorized for Issuance

 

The aggregate number of shares of Common Stock that may be issued under the 2018 Plan and number of shares of our Common Stock that may be subject to incentive stock options granted under the 2018 Plan is 50,000,000 shares.

 

Term

 

The Board may alter, amend, or terminate our 2018 Plan and the Administrator may alter, amend, or terminate any award agreement in whole or in part; however, no termination, amendment, or modification shall adversely affect in any material way any award previously granted, without the written consent of the holder. Our 2018 Plan was adopted on June 7, 2018, became effective on August 2, 2018, and will continue indefinitely until it is terminated by the Board as provided in the 2018 Plan. However, as required by the Internal Revenue Code, no incentive stock option awards may be granted under our 2018 Plan on or after the tenth anniversary of the date the plan was adopted by the Board, unless our 2018 Plan is subsequently amended, with the approval of stockholders, to extend the period for granting such awards.

 

Disclosure of Equity Awards Based on Material Nonpublic Information: None

 

Pay Versus Performance (PVP)

 

In accordance with the SEC’s disclosure requirements regarding pay versus performance, or PVP, this section presents the SEC-defined “Compensation Actually Paid,” or CAP of our PEO and NEOs for each of the fiscal years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, and our financial performance. Also as required by the SEC, this section compares CAP to various measures used to gauge performance at the Company for each such fiscal year. Also as required by the SEC, this section compares CAP to various measures used to gauge performance at the Company.

 

Pay versus Performance Table - Compensation Definitions

 

Salary, Bonus, Stock Awards, and All Other Compensation are each calculated in the same manner for purposes of both CAP and Summary Compensation Table, or SCT values. The primary difference between the calculation of CAP and SCT total compensation is the calculation of the value of “Stock Awards,” with the table below describing the differences in how these awards are valued for purposes of SCT total and CAP:

 

    SCT Total   CAP
Stock Awards   Grant date fair value of stock awards granted during the year   Fair value of stock awards that are unvested as of the end of the year, or vested during the year

 

Pay Versus Performance Table

 

In accordance with the SEC’s new PVP rules, the following table sets forth information concerning the compensation of our NEOs for each of the fiscal years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, and our financial performance for each such fiscal year:

 

Year (1)  Summary Compensation Table Total for PEO   Compensation Actually Paid to PEO (2)(3)   Average Summary Compensation Table Total for Non-PEO NEOs   Average Compensation Actually Paid to Non-PEO NEOs   Value of Initial Fixed $100 Investment Based On Total Shareholder Return   Net Income (Loss) 
2022  $1,287,420   $1,146,624   $529,219   $473,669   $7.45   $(5,156,478)
2021  $3,202,434   $2,633,672   $1,027,876   $211,683   $25.82   $(7,128,858)

 

(1)The PEO (CEO) in the 2022 and 2021 reporting year is Scott Silverman. The non-PEO NEO in the 2022 reporting year is Allison Tomek. The non-PEO NEO’s in the 2021 reporting year was Vince Pugliese and Allison Tomek.

 

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(2)The CAP was calculated beginning with the PEO’s and NEO’s SCT total. In 2022 and 2021, the following amounts were deducted from and added to the applicable SCT total compensation:

 

   SCT Total   Stock awards deducted from SCT   Increase for fair value of awards granted during the year that remain unvested as of year end   Decrease for change in fair value from prior year-end to current year-end for awards granted in prior years and unvested as of year end   Other
adjustments
   Total CAP 
   (A)   (B)   (C)   (D)   (E)   A - B + C + E 
PEO    
2022   1,287,420    -    -    (140,796)   -    1,146,624 
2021   3,202,434    -    -    (568,762)   -    2,633,672 
                               
Average Non-PEO NEO                              
2022   529,219    -         (55,550)   -    473,669 
2021   1,027,876    (132,000)   16,400    (700,593)   -    211,683 

 

(3)The fair value of stock awards reported for CAP purposes in columns (C) and (D) are based on the quoted closing price of the Company’s common stock on the vesting date or the year end date for unvested stock awards in accordance with the SEC rules. See Note 9, “Stockholder’s Equity” in the Notes to the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements for the fiscal year ended 2022 included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended 2022 for more information regarding the Company’s accounting for share-based compensation.

 

Director Compensation

 

Our non-executive board member receives $5,000 in cash compensation each quarter plus $2,500 per quarter for serving as committee chair.

 

The following table sets forth compensation paid, earned or awarded during 2022 to each of our directors, other than Scott Silverman and Allison Tomek, whose compensation is described in “Summary Compensation Table”.

 

2022 Director Compensation

 

Name  Fees Earned
or Paid in
Cash
($)
   Stock
Awards
($) (1)
   All Other
Compensation
 ($)
   Total
($)
 
Barry M. Edelstein   30,000    24,000    -    54,000 

 

(1) On August 12, 2022, Mr. Edelstein received 2,000,000 shares of restricted stock valued at $24,000, or $0.012 per share, based on the quoted closing price of the Company’s common stock on the measurement date.

 

Directors are also entitled to the protection provided by the indemnification provisions in our articles of incorporation, as amended, and our amended and restated bylaws.

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

The following table sets forth certain information relating to the beneficial ownership of our common stock as of March 31, 2023, by:

 

  each person, or group of affiliated persons, known by us to beneficially own more than five percent of the outstanding shares of our common stock;
     
  each of our directors;
     
  each of our named executive officers; and
     
  all directors and executive officers as a group.

 

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The number of shares beneficially owned by each entity, person, director or executive officer is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC, and the information is not necessarily indicative of beneficial ownership for any other purpose. Under such rules, beneficial ownership includes any shares over which the individual has sole or shared voting power or dispositive power as well as any shares that the individual has the right to acquire within 60 days of March 31, 2023 through the exercise of any stock option, warrants or other rights. Except as otherwise indicated, and subject to applicable community property laws, the persons named in the table have sole voting and dispositive power with respect to all shares of common stock held by that person. 

 

The percentage of shares beneficially owned is computed on the basis of 447,704,272 shares of our common stock outstanding as of March 31, 2023, the implied conversion of 1,144 shares of our Series B Preferred Stock and related accrued dividends as of March 31, 2023 into 215,767,091 shares of common stock, and the implied conversion of 16,270 shares of our Series C Preferred Stock and related accrued dividends as of March 31, 2023 into 406,750,000 shares of common stock for total shares outstanding of 1,070,221,363. Shares of common stock that a person has the right to acquire within 60 days of March 31, 2023, are deemed outstanding for purposes of computing the percentage ownership of the person holding such rights, but are not deemed outstanding for purposes of computing the percentage ownership of any other person, except with respect to the percentage ownership of all directors and executive officers as a group. As a result of the Company’s issuance of 1,144 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, which carries majority voting rights of 50 votes of Common Stock to every 1 share of Series B Preferred Stock, to named executive officers and directors, they have the rights to 9,355,121,489 votes through their Series B holdings, of a total of 10,781,548,091 votes. The percentage of voting rights in the table below assumes that all Series B shares held by directors and named officers are voted in any instance requiring shareholder vote. Unless otherwise noted below, the address of the persons listed on the table is c/o C-Bond Systems, Inc., 6035 South Loop East, Houston, TX 77033. 

 

Name of Beneficial Owner  Common Stock Beneficially Owned   Percent of Outstanding Shares   Percent of Voting
Rights
 
Named Executive Officers and Directors:            
Scott Silverman (2)   207,636,080    35.1%   63.1%
Barry M. Edelstein (4)   20,728,097    4.6%   3.6%
Allison Tomek (5)   42,345,153    8.7%   16.6%
All directors and executive officers as a group (3 persons) (6)   270,709,330    41.6%   83.3%
Other Greater Than 5% Stockholders:               
Jeff Badders (1)   30,844,916    6.9%   * 
Mike Wanke   28,021,016    6.3%   * 
Vince Pugliese (3)   33,751,992    7.1%   10.3%

 

* Indicates beneficial ownership of less than 1% of the total outstanding common stock.
   
(1) Jeff Badders has sole voting and dispositive power with respect to these shares. Mr. Badders’ address is 4002 North Street, Nacogdoches, TX 75965.
   
(2) Includes (i) 64,315,575 shares outstanding pursuant to restricted stock awards and subscription agreement; (ii) 745 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, which may convert into 140,320,505 shares of Common Stock; and (iii) 3,000,000 shares issuable upon the exercise of vested stock options.
   
(3) Includes (i) 517,397 shares held by Mr. Pugliese; (ii) 9,058,433 shares outstanding pursuant to restricted stock awards; (iii) 120 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, which may convert into 22,876,164 shares of Common Stock; and (iv) 1,299,998 shares issuable upon the exercise of vested stock options. The Company has concluded that Mr. Pugliese’s resignation has resulted in him forfeiting his compensation and his restricted and unrestricted stock/equity, but this is not been reflected in its consolidated financial statements.
   
(4) Includes (i) 12,886,364 shares outstanding pursuant to restricted stock awards; and (ii) 41 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, which may convert into 7,841,733 shares of Common Stock.
   
(5) Includes (i) 5,050,000 shares outstanding pursuant to restricted stock awards; and (ii) 200 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, which may convert into 37,295,153 shares of Common Stock.
   
(6) Includes (i) 82,251,939 shares held pursuant to restricted stock awards; (iii) 986 shares of Series B Preferred Stock, which may convert into 185,457,391 shares of Common Stock; and (iv) 3,000,000 shares issuable upon exercise of vested stock options.

 

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Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

The following table sets forth as of December 31, 2022 information regarding our common stock that may be issued under the Company’s equity compensation plans:

 

Plan Category  Number of Securities
to be Issued Upon
Exercise of
Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights
(a)
   Weighted Average
 Exercise Price of
 Outstanding
 Options, Warrants and Rights
(b)
   Number of Securities
 Remaining Available
 for Future Issuance
 Under Equity
 Compensation Plans
 (excluding Securities
 Reflected in Columns
(a)) (c) (1)
 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders   8,445,698   $0.40    9,403,232 
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders   -    -    - 
Total   8,445,698   $0.40    9,403,232 

 

* The table above includes 8,445,698 options that were issued pursuant to the Merger Agreement (adjusted for forfeitures and exercises since the issuance), by converting each option to purchase Common Units issued and outstanding immediately prior to the closing of the Merger into an option to purchase an equivalent number of shares of our common stock.

 

(1) Represents shares available under the C-Bond Systems, Inc. 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan, under which the Company can issue options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock awards, restricted stock units and other types of stock-based awards.

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

Bohemian Companies, LLC and BOCO Investments, LLC are two companies under common control. Mr. Klemsz, our President prior to the Merger, has been the Chief Investment Officer of BOCO Investments, LLC since March 2007. On November 14, 2018, the Company also entered into a Revolving Credit Facility Loan and Security Agreement (“Loan Agreement”) and a Secured Promissory Note (the “Note”) with BOCO Investments, LLC. Subject to and in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Loan Agreement and the Note, BOCO Investments, LLC agreed to lend to the Company up to $400,000 (the “Maximum Loan Amount”) against the issuance and delivery by the Company of the Note for use as working capital and to assist in inventory acquisition. As of December 31, 2018, BOCO Investments, LLC loaned us $400,000 and may loan additional amounts to the Company at any time and from time to time through November 14, 2020, up to an aggregate amount not to exceed the Maximum Loan Amount. The Company must repay all principal, interest and other amounts outstanding on or before November 14, 2020. The Company’s obligations under the Loan Agreement and the Note are secured by a first-priority security interest in substantially all of the Company’s assets (the “Collateral”). The outstanding principal advanced to Company pursuant to the Loan Agreement bears interest at the rate of 12% per annum, compounded annually. The Loan Agreement and Note contain customary representations, warranties and covenants, including covenants requiring the Company to maintain certain inventory and accounts receivable amounts, certain restrictions on the Company’s ability to incur additional debt or create liens on its property. The Loan Agreement and the Note also provide for certain events of default, including, among other things, payment defaults, breaches of representations and warranties and bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, the occurrence of which, after any applicable cure period, would permit Lender, among other things, to accelerate payment of all amounts outstanding under the Loan Agreement and the Note, as applicable, and to exercise its remedies with respect to the Collateral, including the sale of the Collateral. Commencing March 31, 2019 and at all times thereafter through the remainder of the commitment period and for so long thereafter as there is any amount still due and owing under the Note, the Company must maintain an accounts receivable balances plus inventory such that the outstanding principal borrowed by Company under the Loan Agreement and Note is less than or equal to 85% of accounts receivable plus 50% of inventory, all as measured at the same point in time. Commencing on January 10, 2019 and on or before the l0th day of each month thereafter, the Company shall pay BOCO Investments, LLC all interest accrued on outstanding principal under the Loan Agreement and Notes as of the end of the month then concluded. As of December 31, 2022 the Company was in default of certain requirements under the Loan Agreement, including not meeting the requirement regarding minimum asset amount as defined therein. Upon the occurrence of such event of defaults, the Lender may, at its option and in accordance with the Loan Agreement, declare all obligations immediately due and payable, however, as of the date of this Report, the Lender has not made any such declaration.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2021, Mr. Silverman, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Interim Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Chairman of the Board and a greater than 5% stockholder, and Ms. Tomek, the Company’s President, Vice President of Corporate Communications, Secretary, Director and a greater than 5% stockholder, owned 5% and 2.5%, respectively, of a customer of the Company. During the year ended December 31, 2021, the Company recognized sales of $1,200 to this company. The terms of this transaction were considered as an arm’s length transaction.

 

In December 2021, the Company advanced $3,750 to a company partially owned by officers of the Company. The advance was non-interest bearing, payable on demand, and as of December 31, 2021 was reflected as due from related party on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. In June 2022, this advance was deemed uncollectible and the balance was written off to bad debt expense.

 

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On May 2, 2022, the Company entered into a Promissory Note (the “May 2022 Note”) in the principal amount of $250,000 with the Company’s chief executive officer. The May 2022 Note was funded in May 2022 and the Company received net proceeds of $250,000. The May 2022 Note bears interest at a rate of 6% per annum and all outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest is due on May 2, 2024. At any time, the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount of the May 2022 Note and any accrued and unpaid interest without penalty. For the year ended December 31, 2022, interest expense – related party amounted to $10,027. On December 31, 2022, principal amount due and accrued interest payable - related party amounted to $250,000 and $10,027, respectively.

 

For information regarding the number of restricted shares of stock, preferred stock, or options held by the Company’s executive officers, and directors, or an affiliate or immediate family member thereof, see “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management” and “Executive Compensation.”

  

Our board of directors intends to adopt a written related person transaction policy, to set forth the policies and procedures for the review and approval or ratification of related person transactions. This policy will cover, with certain exceptions set forth in Item 404 of Regulation S-K promulgated under the Exchange Act, any transaction, arrangement or relationship, or any series of similar transactions, arrangements or relationships, in which we were or are to be a participant, where the amount involved exceeds or will exceed the lesser of $120,000 or 1% of the average of our total assets as of the end of the last two completed fiscal years and a related person had, has or will have a direct or indirect material interest, including purchases of goods or services by or from the related person or entities in which the related person has a material interest, indebtedness, guarantees of indebtedness and employment by us of a related person.

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

The following table sets forth the fees billed by our principal independent accountants, Salberg & Company, P.A., for each of our last two fiscal years for the categories of services indicated.

 

   Years Ended December 31, 
Category  2022   2021 
Audit Fees  $100,100   $92,700 
Audit Related Fees  $7,500   $64,000 
Tax Fees  $-   $- 
All Other Fees  $-   $- 

 

Audit fees.  Consists of fees billed for the audit of our annual consolidated financial statements included in our Form 10-K, review of our interim financial statements included in our Form 10-Q and services that are normally provided by the accountant in connection with year-end statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.

 

Audit-related fees. Consists of fees billed for assurance and related services that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our consolidated financial statements and are not reported under “Audit Fees”, review of our Forms 8-K filings and services that are normally provided by the accountant in connection with non-year-end statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.

  

Tax fees.  Consists of professional services rendered for tax compliance, tax advice and tax planning.

 

Other fees. The services provided by our accountants within this category consisted of advice and other services not related to the above categories.

 

In June 2018, we established an audit committee, which consists of Barry Edelstein (audit committee chairman). The audit committee’s charter requires that the audit committee pre-approve all audit and non-audit services that our independent auditors provide to the Company, provided that pre-approval of non-audit services is not required if (i) the fees for all such services do not aggregate to more than 5% of total fees paid to the independent auditors in that fiscal year; (ii) such services were not recognized as non-audit services at that time of engagement; and (iii) such services are promptly brought to the attention of the audit committee and approved by the audit committee prior to the completion of the audit. Prior to the formation of the audit committee, our board of directors would evaluate the scope and cost of the engagement of an auditor before the auditor renders audit and audit-related services. All of the audit and audit related fees described above for fiscal years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021 were pre-approved by the audit committee.

 

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PART IV

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBIT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

A.The following documents are filed as part of this Report:

 

1. Consolidated Financial Statements:

 

  Page
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (PCAOB ID No. 106) F-2
Consolidated Balance Sheets at December 31, 2022 and 2021 F-4
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021 F-5
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Deficit for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021 F-6
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021 F-7
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements F-8 to F-44

 

2. Financial Statement Schedules have been omitted since they are either not required, not applicable, or the information is otherwise included.

 

3. Exhibits:

 

The following exhibits are filed herewith or are incorporated by reference to exhibits previously filed with the SEC.

 

Exhibit No.     Exhibit Description
2.1     Agreement and Plan of Merger and Reorganization dated as of April 25, 2018, among WestMountain Alternative Energy, Inc., WETM Acquisition Corp. and C-Bond Systems, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on May 1, 2018, File No. 000-53029).
3.1     Articles of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s SB-2 Registration Statement filed with the SEC on January 2, 2008, File No. 333-148440).
3.2     First Amendment to Articles of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.3 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with SEC on August 11, 2014, File No. 000-53029).
3.3     Second Amendment to Articles of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 20, 2018, File No. 000-53029).
3.4     Amended and Restated Bylaws (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on June 8, 2018, File. No. 000-53029).
3.5     Certificate of Designations, Preferences, Rights and Limitations of Series A Convertible Preferred Stock (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on October 21, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).
3.6     Certificate of Designations, Preferences, Rights and Limitations of Series B Convertible Preferred Stock (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on December 13, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).
3.7     Third Amendment to the Articles of Incorporation of C-Bond Systems, Inc. dated June 30, 2020 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 2, 2020, File. No. 000-53029).
3.8     Certificate of Designations, Preferences, Rights and Limitations of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on August 25, 2020, File. No. 000-53029).
3.9     Certificate of Elimination of Series A Convertible Preferred Stock (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on August 25, 2020, File. No. 000-53029).
3.10     Amended and Restated Certificate of Designations of Preferences, Rights, and Limitations of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock, dated April 28, 2021 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on May 4, 2021)
4.1     Secured Promissory Note, dated November 14, 2018, with BOCO Investments, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on November 20, 2018, File. No. 000-53029).
4.2     Form of Convertible Promissory Note, dated September 6, 2019, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on September 9, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).

 

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4.3     Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant, dated September 6, 2019, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on September 9, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).
4.4     Form of Convertible Promissory Note, dated December 9, 2019, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on December 13, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).
4.5   Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant, dated December 9, 2019, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on December 13, 2020, File. No. 000-53029).
4.6   Form of Convertible Promissory Note, dated March 30, 2020 between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Investor II (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on April 1, 2020, File. No. 000-53029)
4.7   Form of Stock Purchase Warrant, dated March 30, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Investor II (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on April 1, 2020, File. No. 000-53029)
4.8   Form of Convertible Promissory Note, dated April 23, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on May 4, 2020, File. No. 000-53029)
4.9   Form of Stock Purchase Warrant, dated April 23, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on May 4, 2020, File. No. 000-53029)
4.10   Senior Convertible Promissory Note, dated October 15, 2021, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on October 19, 2021, File. No. 000-53029)
4.11   Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated October 15, 2021, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on October 19, 2021, File. No. 000-53029)
4.12   Original Issue Discount Promissory Note and Security Agreement dated March 14, 2022, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on March 18, 2022, File. No. 000-53029)
4.13   Original Issue Discount Senior Convertible Promissory Note, dated April 20, 2022, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on April 22, 2022).
4.14   Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated April 20, 2022, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.4 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on April 22, 2022).
4.15   Promissory Note, dated June 23, 2022, issued by C-Bond Systems, Inc. in favor of GS Capital Partners, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on June 29, 2022).
4.16   Promissory Note, dated July 26, 2022, issued by C-Bond Systems, Inc. in favor of GS Capital Partners, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on August 3, 2022).
4.17   Promissory Note, dated September 6, 2022, issued by C-Bond Systems, Inc. in favor of GS Capital Partners, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on September 9, 2022).
4.18   Promissory Note, dated November 8, 2022, issued by C-Bond Systems, Inc. in favor of Jeff Badders (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.7 to the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on November 14, 2022, File No. 333-227522).
4.19   Senior Convertible Promissory Note, dated November 4, 2022, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and 1800 Diagonal Lending LLC. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.8 to the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on November 14, 2022, File No. 333-227522).
4.20   Convertible Promissory Note, dated December 27, 2022, in favor of Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed with the SEC on December 30, 2022, File No. 333-227522).
10.1+   C-Bond Systems, Inc. 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Company’s Form S-8 Registration Statement filed with the SEC on September 25, 2018, File No. 333-227522).
10.2+   Form of C-Bond Systems, Inc. Restricted Stock Award Agreement under 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Company’s Form S-8 Registration Statement filed with the SEC on September 25, 2018, File No. 333-227522).
10.3+   Form of C-Bond Systems, Inc. Nonqualified Stock Option Award Agreement under 2018 Long-Term Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 to the Company’s Form S-8 Registration Statement filed with the SEC on September 25, 2018, File No. 333-227522).
10.4+   Employment Agreement between C-Bond Systems, LLC and Scott Silverman dated October 18, 2017 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on May 1, 2018, File No. 000-53029).
10.5+   Employment Agreement between C-Bond Systems, LLC and Vince Pugliese dated October 12, 2015, as amended on February 11, 2016 and December 20, 2016 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on May 1, 2018, File No. 000-53029).
10.6+   Employee Agreement between C-Bond Systems, LLC and Vince Pugliese dated effective March 1, 2019 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on April 1, 2019).
10.7+   Consulting Agreement between C-Bond Systems, LLC and Bruce Rich dated January 1, 2018 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on May 1, 2018, File No. 000-53029).

 

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10.8   License Agreement between William Marsh Rice University and C-Bond Systems, Inc. dated April 8, 2016 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on May 1, 2018, File No. 000-53029).
10.9   Form of Subscription Agreement related to the Offering (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.8 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on May 1, 2018, File No. 000-53029).
10.10   Form of Lockup Agreement related to the Offering (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.9 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 1, 2018, File No. 000-53029).
10.11   Revolving Credit Facility Loan and Security Agreement, dated November 14, 2018, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and BOCO Investments, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on November 20, 2018, File. No. 000-53029).
10.12+   Employee Agreement between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Vince Pugliese dated effective March 1, 2019 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on April 1, 2019, File No.: 000-53029).
10.13   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated July 11, 2019 between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and an Accredited Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 16, 2019, File No.: 000-53029).
 10.14   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated July 17, 2019 between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and an Accredited Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 19, 2019, File No.: 000-53029).
10.15   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated July 29, 2019 between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and an Accredited Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 31, 2019, File No.: 000-53029).
10.16   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated September 6, 2019 between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on September 9, 2019 File. No. 000-53029).
10.17   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated October 15, 2019 between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on October 21, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).
10.18   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated October 17, 2019, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor II (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on October 21, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).
10.19   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated November 19, 2019, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on November 22, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).
10.20+   Executive Employment Agreement, dated October 18, 2017 and amended November 19, 2019 between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Scott R. Silverman (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on November 22, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).
10.21   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated December 9, 2019, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on December 13, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).
10.22   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated March 26, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor I (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on April 1, 2020 File. No. 000-53029)
10.23   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated March 26, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor II (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on April 1, 2020, File. No. 000-53029)
10.24   Note dated April 28, 2020, between Comerica Bank and C-Bond Systems, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on May 4, 2020, File. No. 000-53029)
10.25   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated April 23, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on May 4, 2020, File. No. 000-53029)
10.26   Form of Subscription Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on May 15, 2020, File No. 000-53029).
10.27   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated June 2, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on June 5, 2020, File. No. 000-53029).

 

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10.28+   Executive Employment Agreement, dated October 18, 2017, and amended November 19, 2019 and June 30, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Scott R. Silverman (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 2, 2020 File. No. 000-53029).
10.29   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated August 20, 2020 between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on August 25, 2020, File. No. 000-53029).
10.30   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated September 8, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on September 11, 2020, File. No. 000-53029).
10.31   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated October 20, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on October 23, 2020, File. No. 000-53029).
10.32   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated November 6, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.7 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on November 16, 2020 File. No. 000-53029).
10.33   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated December 14, 2020, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on December 18, 2020, File. No. 000-53029).
10.34   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated February 24, 2021, between C-Bond Systems, Inc., and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on February 26, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).
10.35   Form of Secured Loan and Security Agreement, dated May 10, 2021, with the Lender (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on May 14, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).
10.36   Share Exchange Agreement and Plan of Reorganization, dated June 30, 2021, by and between C-Bond Systems, Inc., Mobile Tint LLC, the sole member of Mobile, and Michael Wanke as the Representative of the Mobile Shareholder (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 7, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).
10.37   Form of Amendment to the Exchange Agreement, dated July 21, 2021, by and between C-Bond Systems, Inc., Mobile Tint LLC, the sole member of Mobile, and Michael Wanke as the Representative of the Mobile Shareholder (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 26, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).
10.38   Form of Operating Agreement of Mobile Tint LLC issued July 2021 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 26, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).
10.39   Form of Piggy-Back Registration Rights Agreement, dated July 20, 2021, by and between C-Bond Systems, Inc., Mobile Tint LLC, the sole member of Mobile, and Michael Wanke as the Representative of the Mobile Shareholder (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 26, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).

 

44

 

 

10.40+   Executive Employment Agreement, dated July 21, 2021, by and between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Michael Wanke (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 26, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).
10.41   Form of Commercial Lease Agreement, dated July 20, 2021 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on July 26, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).
10.42   Form of Subscription Agreement, dated August 25, 2021, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on September 1, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).
10.43   Securities Purchase Agreement, dated October 15, 2021, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on October 19, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).
10.44   Registration Rights Agreement, dated October 15, 2021, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the SEC on October 19, 2021, File. No. 000-53029).
10.45   Exchange Agreement, dated April 20, 2022, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on April 22, 2022).
10.46   Securities Purchase Agreement, dated June 23, 2022, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and GS Capital Partners, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on June 29, 2022).
10.47   Securities Purchase Agreement, dated July 26, 2022, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and GS Capital Partners, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on August 3, 2022).
10.48   Securities Purchase Agreement, dated September 6, 2022, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and GS Capital Partners, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on September 9, 2022).
10.49   Securities Purchase Agreement, dated November 4, 2022, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and 1800 Diagonal LLC. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to the Company’s Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on November 14, 2022, File No. 333-227522).
10.50   Securities Purchase Agreement, dated December 27, 2022, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Investor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed with the SEC on December 30, 2022, File No. 333-227522).
10.51   Subscription Agreement, dated January 17, 2023, between C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Scott R. Silverman (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed with the SEC on January 19, 2023, File No. 333-227522).
14.1   Code of Business Conduct and Ethics (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 14.1 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the SEC on April 1, 2019, File. No. 000-53029).
21.1*   List of Subsidiaries
23.1*  

Consent of independent registered public accounting firm.

31.1*   Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13(a)-14(a) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
31.2*   Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13(a)-14(a) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
32.1**   Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.2**   Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
101.INS*   INLINE XBRL INSTANCE DOCUMENT
101.SCH*   INLINE XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION SCHEMA DOCUMENT
101.CAL*   INLINE XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION CALCULATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
101.DEF*   INLINE XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION DEFINITION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
101.LAB*   INLINE XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION LABEL LINKBASE DOCUMENT
101.PRE*   INLINE XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION PRESENTATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
104 *   Cover Page Interactive Data File (formatted as Inline XBRL and contained in Exhibit 101).

 

+ Indicates a management contract or any compensatory plan, contract or arrangement.
   
* Filed herewith
   
** Furnished herewith

 

ITEM 16. 10-K SUMMARY

 

As permitted, the registrant has elected not to supply a summary of information required by Form 10-K.

 

45

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC.
     
Date: March 31, 2023 By: /s/ Scott R. Silverman
    Scott R. Silverman
   

Chief Executive Officer and

Chairman of the Board

 

POWER OF ATTORNEY

 

Each person whose signature appears below hereby appoints Scott R. Silverman as attorney-in-fact with full power of substitution, severally, to execute in the name and on behalf of the registrant and each such person, individually and in each capacity stated below, one or more amendments to the annual report on Form 10-K, which amendments may make such changes in the report as the attorney-in-fact acting deems appropriate and to file any such amendment to the annual report on Form 10-K with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature   Title   Date
         
/s/ Scott R. Silverman   Chief Executive Officer, Interim Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer, Chairman of the Board and Director   March 31, 2023
Scott R. Silverman   (principal executive officer and principal financial and accounting officer)    
         
/s/ Allison Tomek   President and Director   March 31, 2023
Allison Tomek        
         
/s/ Barry M. Edelstein   Director   March 31, 2023
Barry M. Edelstein        

 

46

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2022 and 2021

 

CONTENTS

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (PCAOB ID No. 106) F-2
   
Consolidated Financial Statements:  
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets - As of December 31, 2022 and 2021 F-4
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations - For the Years Ended December 31, 2022 and 2021 F-5
   
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Deficit - For the Years Ended December 31, 2022 and 2021 F-6
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows – For the Years Ended December 31, 2022 and 2021 F-7
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements F-8 to F-44

 

F-1

 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of:

C-Bond Systems, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of C-Bond Systems, Inc. and Subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2022 and 2021, the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in shareholders’ deficit, and cash flows, for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2022, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2022 and 2021, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2022, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has a net loss and cash used in operations of $5,156,478 and $1,584,918 respectively, in 2022 and a working capital deficit, shareholders’ deficit and accumulated deficit of $4,349,384, $7,050,669 and $62,693,184 respectively, at December 31, 2022. These matters raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s Plan in regard to these matters is also described in Note 2. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

2295 NW Corporate Blvd., Suite 240 • Boca Raton, FL 33431

Phone: (561) 995-8270 • Toll Free: (866) CPA-8500 • Fax: (561) 995-1920

www.salbergco.com • info@salbergco.com

Member National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts • Registered with the PCAOB

Member CPAConnect with Affiliated Offices Worldwide • Member Center for Public Company Audit Firms

 

F-2

 

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Critical Audit Matters

 

The critical audit matters are matters arising from the current period audit of the consolidated financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the consolidated financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. We determined that there are no critical audit matters.

 

/s/ Salberg & Company, P.A.

 

SALBERG & COMPANY, P.A.

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2017.

Boca Raton, Florida

March 31, 2023

 

F-3

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   December 31,   December 31, 
   2022   2021 
         
ASSETS        
CURRENT ASSETS:        
Cash  $97,091   $519,898 
Accounts receivable, net   269,442    173,248 
Inventory   77,446    82,931 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   71,171    151,746 
Contract assets   279    82,805 
Due from related party   
-
    3,750 
           
Total Current Assets   515,429    1,014,378 
           
OTHER ASSETS:          
Property and equipment, net   96,306    135,022 
Right of use asset, net   375,412    251,172 
Intangible asset, net   279,918    330,421 
Goodwill   350,491    350,491 
Security deposit   6,482    6,482 
           
Total Other Assets   1,108,609    1,073,588 
           
TOTAL ASSETS  $1,624,038   $2,087,966 
           
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT          
           
CURRENT LIABILITIES:          
Convertible notes payable, net of discount  $1,031,250   $171,875 
Notes payable, net of discount   1,576,438    488,414 
Accounts payable   779,765    831,648 
Accrued expenses   736,393    436,733 
Accrued interest payable - related party   10,027    
-
 
Accrued compensation   590,632    691,602 
Contract liabilities   22,637    10,426 
Lease liability, current portion   117,671    44,927 
           
Total Current Liabilities   4,864,813    2,675,625 
           
LONG-TERM LIABILITIES:          
Convertible notes payable, net of current portion and discount   251,263    
-
 
Note payable, net of current portion and discount   208,804    539,440 
Note payable - related party   250,000    
-
 
Lease liability, net of current portion   258,895    206,319 
           
Total Long-term Liabilities   968,962    745,759 
           
Total Liabilities   5,833,775    3,421,384 
           
Commitments and Contingencies (See Note 11)   
 
    
 
 
          
Series B convertible preferred stock: $0.10 par value, 100,000 shares designated; 1,000 and 722 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively ($1,037,201 redemption and liquidation value at December 31, 2022)   1,037,201    738,611 
          
Series C convertible preferred stock: $0.10 par value, 100,000 shares designated; 17,290 and 18,680 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively ($2,860,518 redemption and liquidation value at December 31, 2022)   1,803,731    1,907,012 
           
SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT:          
Preferred stock: $0.10 par value, 2,000,000 shares authorized; 100,000 Series B and 100,000 Series C designated   
-
    
-
 
Common stock: $0.001 par value, 4,998,000,000 shares authorized; 350,270,172 and 282,216,632 issued and outstanding at December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively   350,270    282,217 
Additional paid-in capital   55,141,503    53,064,616 
Accumulated deficit   (62,693,184)   (57,515,129)
Total C-Bond Systems, Inc. shareholders’ deficit   (7,201,411)   (4,168,296)
Noncontrolling Interest   150,742    189,255 
           
Total Shareholders’ Deficit   (7,050,669)   (3,979,041)
           
Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Deficit  $1,624,038   $2,087,966 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

   For the Year Ended 
   December 31, 
   2022   2021 
         
SALES:        
Third parties  $2,232,646   $1,475,628 
Related party   
-
    1,200 
           
Total Sales   2,232,646    1,476,828 
           
COST OF SALES (excluding depreciation expense)   954,402    657,298 
           
GROSS PROFIT   1,278,244    819,530 
           
OPERATING EXPENSES:          
Compensation and related benefits (including stock-based compensation of $1,039,943 and $4,085,868 for the years ended December 31, 2022, and 2021, respectively)   2,844,783    6,165,006 
Research and development   
-
    (3,250)
Professional fees   815,542    1,031,540 
General and administrative expenses   810,413    636,353 
           
Total Operating Expenses   4,470,738    7,829,649 
           
LOSS FROM OPERATIONS   (3,192,494)   (7,010,119)
           
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSES):          
(Loss) gain on debt extinguishment and inducement expense, net   (343,895)   96,442 
Other income   
-
    67,778 
Interest expense   (1,610,062)   (282,959)
Interest expense - related party   (10,027)   
-
 
           
Total Other Expenses, net   (1,963,984)   (118,739)
           
NET LOSS   (5,156,478)   (7,128,858)
           
Net loss (income) of subsidiary attributable to noncontrolling interest   38,513    (15,525)
Preferred stock dividend and deemed dividend   (60,090)   (4,401,907)
           
NET LOSS ATTRIBUTABLE TO COMMON SHAREHOLDERS  $(5,178,055)  $(11,546,290)
           
NET LOSS PER COMMON SHARE:          
Basic and diluted
  $(0.02)  $(0.05)
           
WEIGHTED AVERAGE COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING:          
Basic and diluted
   308,121,062    254,299,139 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2022 AND 2021

 

           Additional           Total 
   Common Stock   Paid-in   Accumulated   Noncontrolling   Shareholders’ 
   # of Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Interest   Deficit 
                         
Balance, December 31, 2020   228,346,974   $228,347   $42,573,272   $(45,968,839)  $
-
   $(3,167,220)
                               
Common shares issued for accounts payable   3,801,224    3,801    114,037    
-
    
-
    117,838 
Common shares issued for acquisition   28,021,016    28,021    666,900    
-
    
-
    694,921 
Common shares issued for professional fees   13,250,000    13,250    540,950    
-
    
-
    554,200 
Common shares issued for compensation   4,676,500    4,677    19,736    
-
    
-
    24,413 
Common shares issued for accrued compensation   944,767    945    54,796    
-
    
-
    55,741 
Common shares issued for cashless warrant exercise   1,008,000    1,008    (1,008)   
-
    
-
    
-
 
Common shares issued for conversion of Series C preferred stock   1,500,000    1,500    10,500    
-
    
-
    12,000 
Common stock issued in connection with convertible debt   668,151    668    13,396    
 
    
 
    14,064 
Preferred stock dividends and deemed dividend   -    
-
    4,354,761    (4,401,907)   
-
    (47,146)
Accretion of stock-based compensation        
 
    267,530    
-
    
-
    267,530 
Accretion of stock-based professional fees   -    
-
    5,000    
-
    
-
    5,000 
Beneficial conversion charge for issuance of Series B preferred shares for accrued compensation recorded as stock-based compensation   -    
-
    3,778,810    
-
    
-
    3,778,810 
Initial noncontrolling in acquired business   -    
-
    
-
    
-
    173,730    173,730 
Beneficial conversion feature connection with convertible debt   -    
-
    318,794    
-
    
-
    318,794 
Issuance of warrants in connection with convertible debt   -    
-
    347,142    
-
    
-
    347,142 
Net loss   -    
-
    
-
    (7,144,383)   15,525    (7,128,858)
                               
Balance, December 31, 2021   282,216,632    282,217    53,064,616    (57,515,129)   189,255    (3,979,041)
                               
Common stock issued for accounts payable   90,859    90    2,084    
-
    
-
    2,174 
Common stock issued for compensation   3,500,000    3,500    10,750    
-
    
-
    14,250 
Common stock issued for professional fees   17,954,545    17,954    199,296    
-
    
-
    217,250 
Common stock issued for conversion of Series C preferred stock   21,262,973    21,263    117,737    
-
    
-
    139,000 
Common stock issued in connection with debt   10,245,163    10,246    100,385    
-
    
-
    110,631 
Common stock issued as inducement to extend note payable   15,000,000    15,000    97,500    
-
    
-
    112,500 
Preferred stock dividends and deemed dividend   -    
-
    4,435    (60,090)   
-
    (55,655)
Accretion of stock-based compensation   -    
-
    68,137    
-
    
-
    68,137 
Relative fair value of warrants issued in connection with debt   -    
-
    325,785    
-
    
-
    325,785 
Beneficial conversion charge for issuance of Series B preferred shares for accrued compensation recorded as stock-based compensation   -    
-
    957,556    
-
    
-
    957,556 
Beneficial conversion feature on convertible debt   -    
-
    354,215    
-
    
-
    354,215 
Beneficial conversion feature buyback related to debt extinguishment   -    
-
    (160,993)   
-
    
-
    (160,993)
Net loss   -    
-
    
-
    (5,117,965)   (38,513)   (5,156,478)
                               
Balance, December 31, 2022   350,270,172   $350,270   $55,141,503   $(62,693,184)  $150,742   $(7,050,669)

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-6

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

   For the Year Ended 
   December 31, 
   2022   2021 
         
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:        
Net loss  $(5,156,478)  $(7,128,858)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization expense   89,219    45,967 
Amortization of debt discount to interest expense   1,059,752    171,875 
Interest expense for put premium on convertible notes   90,731    
-
 
Default penalty included in interest expense   206,250    
-
 
Stock-based compensation   1,039,943    4,085,868 
Stock-based professional fees   298,571    478,129 
Bad debt expense   7,716    39,355 
Allowance for obsolete inventory   
-
    45,000 
Gain on sale of property and equipment   (5,500)   (13,000)
Non-cash loss (gain) on debt extinguishment and inducement expense   343,895    (96,442)
Lease costs   1,080    (370)
Change in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   (100,160)   (73,180)
Inventory   5,485    17,288 
Prepaid expenses and other assets   (746)   (13,211)
Contract assets   82,526    (50,106)
Due from related party   
-
    1,776 
Accounts payable   (49,709)   88,853 
Accrued expenses   299,660    92,148 
Accrued interest - related party   10,027    
-
 
Customer deposit   
-
    (110,000)
Accrued compensation   180,609    601,431 
Contract liabilities   12,211    10,426 
           
NET CASH USED IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES   (1,584,918)   (1,807,051)
           
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:          
Cash proceeds from sale of property and equipment   5,500    13,000 
Cash received from acquisition   
-
    288,901 
           
NET CASH PROVIDED BY INVESTING ACTIVITIES   5,500    301,901 
           
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Proceeds from note payable - related party   250,000    
-
 
Proceeds from sale of series C preferred stock   
-
    550,000 
Proceeds from note payable   903,760    500,000 
Repayment of notes payable   (157,149)   (28,359)
Proceeds from convertible notes payable   160,000    680,000 
           
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES   1,156,611    1,701,641 
           
NET (DECREASE) INCREASE IN CASH   (422,807)   196,491 
           
CASH, beginning of year   519,898    323,407 
           
CASH, end of year  $97,091   $519,898 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION          
Cash paid for:          
Interest  $479,509   $53,283 
Income taxes  $
-
   $
-
 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NON-CASH INVESTING AND FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Common stock issued as prepaid for services  $217,250   $98,800 
Common stock issued for accrued compensation  $
-
   $40,626 
Series B preferred stock issued for accrued compensation  $278,654   $295,000 
Common stock issued for accounts payable  $2,174   $117,838 
Preferred stock dividend accrued  $55,655   $47,146 
Deemed dividend related to beneficial conversion feature of Series C preferred shares  $
-
   $4,354,761 
Increase in debt discount and paid-in capital for shares issued with convertible debt  $110,631   $
-
 
Increase in debt discount and paid-in capital for warrants and beneficial conversion features  $680,000   $680,000 
Conversion of series C preferred stock to common stock  $139,000   $12,000 
Increase in right of use and lease liability  $184,375   $
-
 
           
ACQUISITION:          
Assets acquired:          
Cash  $
-
   $288,901 
Accounts receivable, net   
-
    59,726 
Inventory   
-
    68,019 
Prepaid expenses   
-
    6,091 
Contract assets   
-
    32,699 
Property and equipment   
-
    140,211 
Right of use assets   
-
    253,433 
Total assets acquired   
-
    849,080 
Less: liabilities assumed:          
Accounts payable   
-
    65,728 
Accrued expenses   
-
    159,262 
Notes payable   
-
    95,013 
Customer deposit   
-
    110,000 
Lease liabilities   
-
    253,433 
Noncontrolling interest   
-
    173,730 
Total liabilities assumed   
-
    857,166 
Net liabilities assumed   
-
    8,086 
Fair value of shares for acquisition   
-
    694,921 
Increase in intangible assets - non-cash  $
-
   $703,007 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-7

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF ORGANIZATION

 

Nature of Organization

 

C-Bond Systems, Inc., together with its subsidiaries (the “Company”), is a materials development company and sole owner, developer, and manufacturer of the patented C-Bond technology. The Company is engaged in the implementation of proprietary nanotechnology applications and processes to enhance properties of strength, functionality, and sustainability of brittle material systems. The Company’s primary focus is in the multi-billion-dollar glass and window film industry with target markets in the United States and internationally. Additionally, the Company has expanded its product line to include disinfection products. The Company operates in two divisions: C-Bond Transportation Solutions and Patriot Glass Solutions. C-Bond Transportation Solutions sells a windshield strengthening, water repellent solution called C-Bond nanoShield™ as well as disinfection products. Patriot Glass Solutions sells multi-purpose glass strengthening primer and window film mounting solutions, including C-Bond BRS, a ballistic-resistant film system, and C-Bond Secure, a forced entry system.

 

On June 30, 2021, the Company entered into a Share Exchange Agreement and Plan of Reorganization (the “Exchange Agreement”) with (i) Mobile Tint LLC, a Texas limited liability company doing business as A1 Glass Coating (“Mobile”), (ii) the sole member of Mobile (the “Mobile Shareholder”), and (iii) Michael Wanke as the Representative of the Mobile Shareholder. Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, the Company agreed to acquire 80% of Mobile’s units, representing 80% of Mobile’s issued and outstanding capital stock (the “Mobile Shares”). On July 22, 2021, the Company closed the Exchange Agreement and acquired 80% of the Mobile Shares. The Mobile Shares were exchanged for 28,021,016 restricted shares of the Company’s common stock in an amount equal to $800,000, divided by the average of the closing prices of the Company’s common stock during the 30-day period immediately prior to the closing. Two years after closing, the Company has the option to acquire the remaining 20% of Mobile’s issued and outstanding membership interests in exchange for a number of shares of the Company’s common stock equal to 300% of Mobile’s average EBIT value, divided by the price of the Company’s common stock as defined in the Exchange Agreement (the “Additional Closing”). Mobile provides quality window tint solutions for auto, home, and business owners across Texas, specializing in automotive window tinting, residential window film, and commercial window film that stop harmful UV rays from passing through its window films for reduced glare, comfortable temperatures, and lower energy bills. Mobile also carries products that offer forced-entry protection and films that protect glass from scratches, graffiti, other types of vandalism, and even bullets, including C-Bond BRS and C-Bond Secure products. As part of the transaction, Mobile’s owner-operator, Mr. Wanke, joined the Company as President of its Patriot Glass Solutions division.

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation

 

The Company’s consolidated financial statements include the financial statements of its wholly owned subsidiary, C-Bond Systems, LLC, and its 80% owned subsidiary, Mobile since acquiring 80% of Mobile on July 22, 2021. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Going Concern

 

These consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. As reflected in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, the Company had a net loss of $5,156,478 and $7,128,858 for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. The net cash used in operations was $1,584,918 and $1,807,051 for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. Additionally, the Company had an accumulated deficit, shareholders’ deficit, and working capital deficit of $62,693,184, $7,050,669 and $4,349,384, respectively, on December 31, 2022. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of this report. Management cannot provide assurance that the Company will ultimately achieve profitable operations or become cash flow positive or raise additional debt and/or equity capital. The Company is seeking to raise capital through additional debt and/or equity financings to fund its operations in the future. Although the Company has historically raised capital from sales of common shares and preferred shares, and from the issuance of promissory notes and convertible promissory notes, there is no assurance that it will be able to continue to do so. If the Company is unable to raise additional capital or secure additional lending in the near future, management expects that the Company will need to curtail its operations. These consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.  

 

F-8

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Estimates during the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021 include estimates for allowance for doubtful accounts on accounts receivable, the estimates for obsolete or slow moving inventory, estimates used in the calculation of progress towards completion on uncompleted jobs, purchase price allocation of acquired businesses, the useful life of property and equipment, assumptions used in assessing impairment of long-term assets, the estimate of the fair value lease liability and related right of use asset, the valuation of redeemable and mandatorily redeemable preferred stock, the value of beneficial conversion features and deemed dividends, the valuation allowances for deferred tax assets, and the fair value of non-cash equity transactions.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments and Fair Value Measurements

 

The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets for cash, accounts receivable, contract assets and liabilities, notes payable, convertible note payable, accounts payable, accrued expenses, accrued compensation, and lease liabilities approximate their fair market value based on the short-term maturity of these instruments.

 

The Company analyzes all financial instruments with features of both liabilities and equity under the Financial Accounting Standard Board’s (the “FASB”) accounting standard for such instruments. Under this standard, financial assets and liabilities are classified in their entirety based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The Company did not identify any assets or liabilities that are required to be presented on the balance sheet at fair value in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 820.

 

ASC 825-10 “Financial Instruments”, allows entities to voluntarily choose to measure certain financial assets and liabilities at fair value (fair value option). The fair value option may be elected on an instrument-by-instrument basis and is irrevocable, unless a new election date occurs. If the fair value option is elected for an instrument, unrealized gains and losses for that instrument should be reported in earnings at each subsequent reporting date. The Company did not elect to apply the fair value option to any outstanding instruments.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

For purposes of the consolidated statements of cash flows, the Company considers all highly liquid instruments with a maturity of three months or less at the purchase date and money market accounts to be cash equivalents. The Company had no cash equivalents as of December 31, 2022 and 2021.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

The Company recognizes an allowance for losses on accounts receivable in an amount equal to the estimated probable losses net of recoveries. The allowance is based on an analysis of historical bad debt experience, current receivables aging, and expected future write-offs, as well as an assessment of specific identifiable customer accounts considered at risk or uncollectible. The expense associated with the allowance for doubtful accounts is recognized as general and administrative expense.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory, consisting of raw materials and finished goods, are stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value utilizing the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. A reserve is established when management determines that certain inventories may not be saleable. If inventory costs exceed expected net realizable value due to obsolescence or quantities in excess of expected demand, the Company will record reserves for the difference between the cost and the net realizable value. These reserves are recorded based on estimates and included in cost of sales.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost and are depreciated using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives, which range from one to seven years. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of the useful life or lease term including scheduled renewal terms. Maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred. When assets are retired or disposed of, the cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts, and any resulting gains or losses are included in income in the year of disposition. The Company examines the possibility of decreases in the value of these assets when events or changes in circumstances reflect the fact that their recorded value may not be recoverable.

 

F-9

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

Goodwill and Intangible Assets

 

Goodwill represents the future economic benefit arising from other assets acquired that could not be individually identified and separately recognized. Any goodwill arising from the Company’s acquisition is attributable to the value of the potential expanded market opportunity with new customers. Intangible assets may have either an identifiable or indefinite useful life. Intangible assets with identifiable useful lives are amortized on a straight-line basis over their economic or legal life, whichever is shorter. The Company’s amortizable intangible assets are being amortized over a useful life of 5 years.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 360, the Company reviews long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be fully recoverable, or at least annually. The Company recognizes an impairment loss when the sum of expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset. The amount of impairment is measured as the difference between the asset’s estimated fair value and its book value.

 

Derivative Financial Instruments

 

The Company had certain financial instruments that were embedded derivatives. The Company evaluated all its financial instruments to determine if those contracts or any potential embedded components of those contracts qualify as derivatives to be separately accounted for in accordance with ASC 815-10-05-4, Derivatives and Hedging and 815-40, Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity. This accounting treatment requires that the carrying amount of any embedded derivatives be recorded at fair value at issuance and marked-to-market at each balance sheet date. In the event that the fair value is recorded as a liability, as is the case with the Company, the change in the fair value during the period is recorded as either other income or expense. Upon conversion, exercise or repayment, the respective derivative liability is marked to fair value at the conversion, repayment or exercise date and then the related fair value amount is reclassified to other income or expense as part of gain or loss on extinguishment.

 

Warranty Liability

 

The Company provides limited warranties on its products for product defects for periods ranging from 12 months to the life of the product. Warranty costs may include the cost of product replacement, refunds, labor costs and other costs. Allowances for estimated warranty costs are recorded during the period of sale. The determination of such allowances requires the Company to make estimates of product warranty claim rates and expected costs to repair or to replace the products under warranty. The Company currently establishes warranty reserves based on historical warranty costs for each product line combined with liability estimates based on the prior 12 months’ sales activities. If actual return rates and/or repair and replacement costs differ significantly from the Company’s estimates, adjustments to recognize additional cost of sales may be required in future periods. Historically the warranty accrual and the expense amounts have been immaterial. The warranty liability is included in accrued expenses on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and amounted $26,648 and $26,733 on December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, warranty costs were de minimis.

 

Beneficial Conversion Feature

 

Convertible debt includes conversion terms that are considered in the money compared to the market price of the stock on the date of the related agreement. The Company calculates the beneficial conversion feature and records a debt discount with the amount being amortized to interest expense over the term of the note.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company follows ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASC 606”). This standard establishes a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes most of the existing revenue recognition guidance. ASC 606 requires an entity to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services and requires certain additional disclosures.

 

The Company sells its products which include standard warranties primarily to distributors and authorized dealers. Product sales are recognized at a point in time when the product is shipped to the customer and title is transferred and are recorded net of any discounts or allowances. The warranty does not represent a separate performance obligation.

 

Revenues from contracts for the distribution and installation of window film solutions are recognized over time on the basis of the Company’s estimates of the progress towards completion of contracts using various output or input methods depending on the type of contract terms including (1) the ratio of number of labor hours spent compared to the number of estimated labor hours to complete a job, (2) using the milestone method, or (3) using a units completed method. These methods are used because management considers these to be the best available measure of progress on these contracts. We use the same method for similar types of contracts. The asset, “contract assets” represents revenues recognized in excess of amounts billed. The liability, “contract liabilities,” represents billings in excess of revenues recognized.

 

F-10

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

Cost of Sales

 

Cost of sales includes inventory costs, packaging costs and warranty expenses.

 

Cost of revenues from fixed-price contracts for the distribution and installation of window film solutions include all direct material, sub-contractor, labor and certain other direct costs, as well as those indirect costs related to contract performance, such as indirect labor and fringe benefits. Provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are made in the period in which such losses are determined. Changes in job performance, job conditions and estimated profitability may result in revisions to cost and income, which are recognized in the period in which the revisions are determined. Changes in estimated job profitability resulting from job performance, job conditions, claims, change orders, and settlements, are accounted for as changes in estimates in the current period.

 

Shipping and Handling Costs

 

Shipping and handling costs incurred for product shipped to customers are included in general and administrative expenses and amounted to $45,455 and $15,431 for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. Shipping and handling costs charged to customers are included in sales.

 

Research and Development

 

Research and development costs incurred in the development of the Company’s products are expensed as incurred and includes costs such as labor, materials, and other allocated costs incurred. For the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, research and development costs (recovery) incurred in the development of the Company’s products were $0 and $(3,250), respectively, and are included in operating expenses on the accompanying consolidated statements of operations. In April 2021, the Company received a refund of research and development costs of $3,250.

 

Advertising Costs

 

The Company may participate in various advertising programs. All costs related to advertising of the Company’s products are expensed in the period incurred. For the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, advertising costs charged to operations were $69,737 and $65,626, respectively and are included in general and administrative expenses on the accompanying consolidated statements of operations. These advertising expenses do not include cooperative advertising and sales incentives which shall been deducted from sales.

 

Federal and State Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income tax using the liability method prescribed by ASC 740, “Income Taxes”. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the difference between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates that will be in effect in the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. The Company records a valuation allowance to offset deferred tax assets if based on the weight of available evidence, it is more-likely-than-not that some portion, or all, of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The effect on deferred taxes of a change in tax rates is recognized as income or loss in the period that includes the enactment date.

  

The Company follows the accounting guidance for uncertainty in income taxes using the provisions of ASC 740 “Income Taxes”. Using that guidance, tax positions initially need to be recognized in the financial statements when it is more likely than not the position will be sustained upon examination by the tax authorities. As of December 31, 2022 and 2021, the Company had no uncertain tax positions that qualify for either recognition or disclosure in the financial statements. Tax years that remain subject to examination are the years ending on and after December 31, 2017. The Company recognizes interest and penalties related to uncertain income tax positions in other expense. However, no such interest and penalties were recorded as of December 31, 2022 and 2021.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is accounted for based on the requirements of ASC 718 – “Compensation –Stock Compensation”, which requires recognition in the financial statements of the cost of employee, director, and non-employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments over the period the employee, director, or non-employee is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively, the vesting period). The ASC also requires measurement of the cost of employee, director, and non-employee services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award. The Company has elected to recognize forfeitures as they occur as permitted under the FASB’s Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-09 Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment.

 

F-11

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

Loss Per Common Share

 

ASC 260 “Earnings Per Share”, requires dual presentation of basic and diluted earnings per common share (“EPS”) with a reconciliation of the numerator and denominator of the basic EPS computation to the numerator and denominator of the diluted EPS computation. Basic EPS excludes dilutive securities and non-vested forfeitable shares. Diluted EPS reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common shares were exercised or converted into common shares or resulted in the issuance of common shares that then shared in the earnings of the entity. Basic net loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss available to members by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted net loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted average number of common shares, common share equivalents and potentially dilutive securities outstanding during each period. Potentially dilutive common shares consist of stock options and non-vested forfeitable shares (using the treasury stock method) and shares issuable upon conversion of preferred shares and convertible notes payable (using the as-if converted method). These common share equivalents may be dilutive in the future.

 

All potentially dilutive common shares were excluded from the computation of diluted common shares outstanding as they would have an anti-dilutive impact on the Company’s net losses and consisted of the following: 

 

   December 31, 
   2022   2021 
Stock options   8,445,698    8,445,698 
Warrants   34,000,000    17,500,000 
Series B preferred stock   164,635,079    114,598,413 
Series C preferred stock   432,250,000    296,507,937 
Convertible debt   962,679,774    33,000,000 
Non-vested, forfeitable common shares   16,970,120    14,270,120 
    1,618,980,671    484,322,168 

 

Segment Reporting

 

During the year ended December 31, 2022 and from July 22, 2021 (date of acquisition of Mobile Tint) to December 31, 2021, the Company operated in two reportable business segments which consisted of (1) the manufacture and sale of a windshield strengthening water repellent solution as well as disinfection products, and the sale of multi-purpose glass strengthening primer and window film mounting solutions, including ballistic-resistant film systems and a forced entry system, and (2) the distribution and installation of window film solutions. The Company’s reportable segments are strategic business units that offer different products. They are managed separately based on the fundamental differences in their operations and locations.

 

Leases

 

The Company accounts for leases in accordance with ASC 842. The lease standard requires certain leases to be reported on the consolidated balance sheets as right-of-use assets and lease liabilities. The Company elected the practical expedients permitted under the transition guidance of this standard that retained the lease classification and initial direct costs for any leases that existed prior to adoption of the standard. The Company does not reassess whether any contracts entered into prior to adoption are leases or contain leases.

 

The Company categorize leases with contractual terms longer than twelve months as either operating or finance. Finance leases are generally those leases that would allow the Company to substantially utilize or pay for the entire asset over its estimated life. Assets acquired under finance leases are recorded in property and equipment, net. All other leases are categorized as operating leases. The Company does not have any finance leases as of December 31, 2022 and 2021. The Company’s leases generally have terms that range from three to four years for property and equipment and five years for property. The Company elected the accounting policy to include both the lease and non-lease components of our agreements as a single component and account for them as a lease.

 

Lease liabilities are recognized at the present value of the fixed lease payments using a discount rate based on the Company’s current borrowing rate. Lease assets are recognized based on the initial present value of the fixed lease payments, reduced by landlord incentives, plus any direct costs from executing the leases. Leasehold improvements are capitalized at cost and amortized over the lesser of their expected useful life or the lease term.

 

When the Company has the option to extend the lease term, terminate the lease before the contractual expiration date, or purchase the leased asset, and it is reasonably certain that the Company will exercise the option, the Company considers these options in determining the classification and measurement of the lease. Costs associated with operating lease assets are recognized on a straight-line basis within operating expenses over the term of the lease.

 

F-12

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

Noncontrolling Interest

 

The Company accounts for noncontrolling interest in accordance with ASC Topic 810-10-45, which requires the Company to present noncontrolling interests as a separate component of total shareholders’ deficit on the consolidated balance sheets and the consolidated net loss attributable to its noncontrolling interest be clearly identified and presented on the face of the consolidated statements of operations.

 

Risk and Uncertainties

 

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic and recommended containment and mitigation measures worldwide. The Company was materially affected by the COVID-19 outbreak in 2020 and 2021 and the ultimate duration and severity of the outbreak and its impact on the economic environment and our business is uncertain. The Company saw a material decrease in sales from its international customers as a result of the unprecedented public health crisis from the COVID-19 pandemic and a decrease in domestic sales due to a decrease in business spending on discretionary items. As a result, during 2021 and 2020, the Company’s international customers delayed the ordering of products and delayed or defaulted on payment of balances due to the Company. The lack of collection of accounts receivable balances, which the Company believes was attributable to COVID-19, had a material impact on the cash flows of the Company. The Company believes that COVID-19 had minimal impact on its operations in 2022. The Company cannot estimate the future impact of the pandemic on its business. A severe or prolonged economic downturn could result in a variety of risks to the Company’s business, including weakened demand for its products and a decreased ability to raise additional capital when needed on acceptable terms, if at all. Currently, the Company is unable to estimate the impact of this event on its operations.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In August 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-06, Debt—Debt with Conversion and Other Options (Subtopic 470-20) and Derivatives and Hedging—Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40)—Accounting for Convertible Instruments and Contracts in an Entity’s Own Equity. The ASU simplifies accounting for convertible instruments by removing major separation models required under current U.S. GAAP. Consequently, more convertible debt instruments will be reported as a single liability instrument with no separate accounting for embedded conversion features. The ASU removes certain settlement conditions that are required for equity contracts to qualify for the derivative scope exception, which will permit more equity contracts to qualify for the exception. The ASU also simplifies the diluted net income per share calculation in certain areas. The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2023, including interim periods within those fiscal years, and early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of the standard on the consolidated financial statements.

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, which significantly changes how entities will measure credit losses for most financial assets, including accounts receivable. ASU No. 2016-13 will replace today’s “incurred loss” approach with an “expected loss” model, under which companies will recognize allowances based on expected rather than incurred losses. On November 15, 2019, the FASB delayed the effective date of Topic 326 for certain small public companies and other private companies until fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022 for SEC filers that are eligible to be smaller reporting companies under the SEC’s definition, as well as private companies and not-for-profit entities. The Company is currently evaluating the new guidance and has not yet determined whether the adoption of the new standard will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements or the method of adoption.

 

In March 2022, the FASB issued ASU No. 2022-02, Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326): Troubled Debt Restructurings and Vintage Disclosures. The guidance was issued as improvements to ASU No. 2016-13 described above. The vintage disclosure changes require an entity to disclose current-period gross write-offs by year of origination for financing receivables. The guidance is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The amendments should be applied prospectively. Early adoption of the amendments is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. The amendments will impact our disclosures but will not otherwise impact the consolidated financial statements. The Company is currently evaluating the new guidance.

 

Other accounting standards that have been issued or proposed by FASB that do not require adoption until a future date are not expected to have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements upon adoption. The Company does not discuss recent pronouncements that are not anticipated to have an impact on or are unrelated to its financial condition, results of operations, cash flows or disclosures.

 

F-13

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

NOTE 3 - ACQUISITION OF MOBILE TINT LLC

 

On June 30, 2021, the Company entered into a Share Exchange Agreement and Plan of Reorganization (the “Exchange Agreement”) with (i) Mobile Tint LLC, a Texas limited liability company doing business as A1 Glass Coating (“Mobile”), (ii) the sole member of Mobile (the “Mobile Member”), and (iii) Michael Wanke as the Representative of the Mobile Member. Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, the Company agreed to acquire 80% of Mobile’s member units, representing 80% of Mobile’s issued and outstanding membership units (the “Mobile Member Units”). On July 22, 2021, the Company closed the Exchange Agreement and acquired 80% of the Mobile Member Units. The Mobile Member Units were exchanged for restricted shares of the Company’s common stock, in an amount equal to $800,000, divided by the average of the closing prices of the Company’s common stock during the 30-day period immediately prior to the closing as defined in the Exchange Agreement. In connection with the Exchange Agreement, the Company issued 28,021,016 shares of its common stock. These shares were valued at $694,921, or $0.0248 per common share, based on the quoted closing price of the Company’s common stock on July 22, 2021, the measurement date. Two years after closing, the Company has the option to acquire the remaining 20% of Mobile’s issued and outstanding membership interests in exchange for a number of shares of the Company’s common stock equal to 300% of Mobile’s average EBIT value, divided by the price of the Company’s common stock as defined in the Exchange Agreement (the “Additional Closing”).

 

The Company also entered into an Amendment to the Exchange Agreement, dated July 21, 2021, which, among other things, stipulates that for U.S. federal income tax purposes the Exchange and the Additional Closing (if exercised) are intended to qualify as a “reorganization” within the meaning of Section 368(a) of the Code and the Treasury Regulations, and the definition of “Total EBIT Value” shall mean Mobile’s net income, before income tax expense and interest expense have been deducted, for the period beginning on July 1, 2021 and ending on June 30, 2023, plus fifty percent (50%) of the Mobile Member’s Base Salary, as defined in the Executive Employment Agreement dated July 21, 2021, between the Mobile Member and the Company (the “Employment Agreement”), as described below.

 

The exchange Agreement transaction documents include the Operating Agreement of Mobile (the “Operating Agreement”) which, among other things, appoints Mr. Wanke, Scott R. Silverman, and Allison Tomek as the Managers of Mobile, and governs the operations of Mobile as outlined therein. Under the terms of the Operating Agreement, the Managers shall not have the authority to perform or approve the following actions, among other things, unless such action is also approved by a unanimous vote: to terminate the existing lease between Company and MDW Management, LLC, an entity owned by Michael Wanke and his spouse; to borrow money for the Company from banks, other lending institutions, the Manager, Members, or affiliates of the Manager or Members; to establish lines of credit in the name of the Company with financial institutions such as banks or other lending institutions; to determine and declare distributions to Members of Mobile.

 

In connection with the Exchange Agreement, the Company entered into a Piggy-Back Registration Rights Agreement dated July 20, 2021 (the “Registration Rights Agreement”) with Mobile, the Mobile Member, and Mr. Wanke, pursuant to which if at any time on or after the date of the closing, the Company proposes to file any Registration Statement (a “Registration Statement”) with respect to any offering of equity securities by the Company for its own account or for shareholders of the Company, other than a Form S-8 Registration Statement, a dividend reinvestment plan, or in connection with a merger or acquisition, then the Company shall (x) give written notice of such proposed filing to the holders of registrable securities no less than ten (10) days before the anticipated filing date of the Registration Statement, and (y) offer to the holders of registrable securities the opportunity to register the sale of either (i) an amount of registrable securities equal to the total number of shares of the Company’s common stock being registered in such Registration Statement that are being offered solely for the Company’s account excluding the registrable securities; or (ii) an amount of registrable securities equal to the total number of shares of the Company’s common stock being registered for resale by shareholders of the Company excluding the registrable securities. 

 

In connection with the Exchange Agreement, the Company was named as guarantor (“Guarantor”) of a Commercial Lease Agreement dated July 21, 2021, by and between landlord MDW Management, LLC, a company owned by Michael Wanke and his wife and tenant Mobile Tint, LLC d/b/a A-1 Glass (the “Lease”). The term of the Lease is 60 months, at a minimum monthly rent of $5,600 (not including tax), with two five-year options for the tenant to renew. The Company’s obligation as Guarantor of the Lease will terminate upon the occurrence of earlier of the following: (i) the date of Guarantor’s acquisition of 100% of the ownership interests of Mobile; (ii) the date that Guarantor beneficially owns less than an eighty percent (80%) ownership interest in Mobile; or (iii) two (2) years from and after the effective date of the guaranty.

 

F-14

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

In connection with the Exchange Agreement, the assets acquired and liabilities assumed were recorded at their estimated fair values on the acquisition date, subject to adjustment during the measurement period with subsequent changes recognized in earnings or loss. These estimates were inherently uncertain and are subject to refinement. Management develops estimates based on assumptions as a part of the purchase price allocation process to value the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the business acquisition date. As a result, during the purchase price measurement period, which may be up to one year from the business acquisition date, the Company may record adjustments to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on completion of valuations, with the corresponding offset to goodwill. After the purchase price measurement period, the Company will record any adjustments to assets acquired or liabilities assumed in operating expenses in the period in which the adjustments may have been determined. Based upon the purchase price allocation, the following table summarizes the estimated fair value of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed at the date of the respective acquisition:

 

   Total 
Assets acquired:    
Cash  $288,901 
Accounts receivable, net   59,726 
Inventory   68,019 
Prepaid expenses and other   6,091 
Contract assets   32,699 
Property and equipment   140,211 
Right of use asset   253,433 
Intangible assets   352,516 
Goodwill   350,491 
Total assets acquired at fair value   1,552,087 
Less: total liabilities assumed:     
Notes payable   95,013 
Accounts payable   65,728 
Accrued expenses   159,262 
Customer deposit   110,000 
Lease liability   253,433 
Noncontrolling interest   173,730 
Total liabilities assumed   857,166 
Net assets acquired  $694,921 
Purchase consideration paid:     
Fair value of common shares issued  $694,921 
Total purchase consideration paid  $694,921 

 

The following unaudited pro forma consolidated results of operations have been prepared as if the acquisition of Mobile Tint LLC had occurred as of the beginning of the following year:  

 

   For the Year Ended
December 31,
2021
 
Net Revenues  $2,168,863 
Net Loss  $(7,128,027)
Net Loss per Share  $(0.03)

 

Pro forma data does not purport to be indicative of the results that would have been obtained had these events actually occurred at the beginning of the periods presented and is not intended to be a projection of future results.

 

NOTE 4 – ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

 

On December 31, 2022 and 2021, accounts receivable consisted of the following:

 

   December 31,
2022
   December 31,
2021
 
Accounts receivable  $304,964   $204,804 
Less: allowance for doubtful accounts   (35,522)   (31,556)
Accounts receivable, net  $269,442   $173,248 

 

For the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, bad debt expense amounted to $7,716 and $39,355, respectively.

 

F-15

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

NOTE 5 – INVENTORY

 

On December 31, 2022 and 2021, inventory consisted of the following:

 

   December 31,
2022
   December 31,
2021
 
Raw materials  $1,501   $7,141 
Finished goods   75,945    120,790 
Inventory   77,446    127,931 
Less: allowance for obsolete or slow-moving inventory   
-
    (45,000)
Inventory, net  $77,446   $82,931 

 

For the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, a loss from allowance for slow moving inventory amounted to $0 and $45,000, respectively, and is included in cost of sales on the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.

 

NOTE 6 – PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

On December 31, 2022 and 2021, property and equipment consisted of the following: 

 

   Useful Life  December 31,
2022
   December 31,
2021
 
Machinery and equipment  57 years  $124,133   $124,133 
Furniture and office equipment  37 years   32,306    32,306 
Vehicles  15 years   62,195    63,009 
Leasehold improvements  35 years   45,296    45,296 
       263,930    264,744 
Less: accumulated depreciation      (167,624)   (129,722)
Property and equipment, net     $96,306   $135,022 

 

During the year ended December 31, 2022, the Company sold a vehicle and other equipment for proceeds of $5,500 and record a gain on sale of property and equipment of $5,500 which is included in general and administrative expenses on the accompanying consolidated statement of operations. During the year ended December 31, 2021, the Company sold a vehicle for proceeds of $13,000 and record a gain on sale of property and equipment of $13,000 which is included in general and administrative expenses on the accompanying consolidated statement of operations. For the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, depreciation expense is included in general and administrative expenses and amounted to $38,716 and $23,872, respectively. 

 

NOTE 7 – INTANGIBLE ASSETS AND GOODWILL

 

On December 31, 2022 and 2021, intangible assets, which were acquired from Mobile in 2021 (See Note 3), consisted of the following:

 

   Useful life  December 31,
2022
   December 31,
2021
 
Customer relations  5 years  $212,516   $212,516 
Non-compete  5 years   40,000    40,000 
Trade name 
-
   100,000    100,000 
       352,516    352,516 
Less: accumulated amortization      (72,598)   (22,095)
Intangible assets, net     $279,918   $330,421 

 

   Useful life   December 31,
2022
   December 31,
2021
 
Goodwill   
-
   $350,491   $350,491 

 

F-16

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

For the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, amortization expense of intangible assets amounted to $50,503 and $22,095, respectively. On December 31, 2022, accumulated amortization amounted to $61,098 and $11,500 for the customer relations and non-compete, respectively. On December 31, 2021, accumulated amortization amounted to $18,595 and $3,500 for the customer relations and non-compete, respectively.

 

Amortization of intangible assets with identifiable useful lives that is attributable to future periods is as follows:

 

Twelve months ending December 31:  Amount 
2023  $50,503 
2024   50,503 
2025   50,503 
2026   28,409 
Total  $179,918 

 

NOTE 8 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE

 

Mercer Convertible Debt

 

On October 15, 2021, the Company entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement (the “SPA”) with Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (the “Investor”), pursuant to which the Company issued and sold to Investor a 10% Original Issue Discount Senior Convertible Promissory Note in the principal amount of $825,000 (the “Initial Note”) and five-year warrants to purchase up to 16,500,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.05 per share, an amount equal to 50% of the conversion shares that were issued (the “Initial Warrants”). The Company received net proceeds of $680,000, which is net of original issue discounts of $75,000, placement fees of $60,000, and legal fees of $10,000. The transactions contemplated under the SPA closed on October 18, 2021.

 

Pursuant to the SPA, the Investor agreed to purchase an additional $825,000 10% Original Issue Discount Senior Convertible Promissory Note (the “Second Note,” and together with the Initial Note, the “Notes”), and a five-year warrant (the “Second Warrant,” and together with the Initial Warrant, the “Warrants”) to purchase, in the aggregate, shares of the Company’s common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.05 per share from the Company in an amount equal to 50% of the conversion shares to be issued upon the same terms as the Initial Note and Initial Warrant (subject to there being no event of default under the Initial Note or other customary closing conditions), within three trading days of a registration statement registering the shares of the Company’s common stock issuable under the Notes (the “Conversion Shares”) and upon exercise of the Warrants (the “Warrant Shares”) being declared effective by the SEC. To date, the Investor did not purchase the Second Note.

 

The Initial Note matured 12 months after issuance, bore interest at a rate of 4% per annum through the date of default, and was initially convertible beginning on the six-month anniversary of the original issue date into the Company’s common stock at a fixed conversion price of $0.025 per share, subject to adjustment for stock splits, stock combinations, dilutive issuances, and similar events, as described in the Initial Note.

 

The Initial Note may be prepaid at any time for the first 90 days at face value plus accrued interest. From day 91 through day 180, the Note may be prepaid in an amount equal to 110% of the principal amount plus accrued interest. From day 181 through the day immediately preceding the maturity date, the Initial Note may be prepaid in an amount equal to 120% of the principal amount plus accrued interest.

 

The Note and Warrants contain conversion limitations providing that a holder thereof may not convert the Notes or exercise the Warrants to the extent (but only to the extent) that, if after giving effect to such conversion, the holder or any of its affiliates would beneficially own in excess of 4.99% of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock immediately after giving effect to such conversion or exercise. A holder may increase or decrease its beneficial ownership limitation upon notice to the Company provided that in no event such limitation exceeds 9.99%, and that any increase shall not be effective until the 61st day after such notice.

 

In connection with the SPA, the Company entered into a Registration Rights Agreement dated October 15, 2021 (the “Registration Rights Agreement”), with the Investor pursuant to which it is obligated to file a registration statement with the SEC within 45 days after the date of the agreement to register the resale by the Investor of the conversion shares and warrant shares, and use all commercially reasonable efforts to have the registration statement declared effective by the SEC within 60 days after the registration statement is filed.

 

Upon the occurrence of an event of default under the Notes, the Investor has the right to be prepaid at 125% of the outstanding principal balance and accrued interest, and interest accrues at 18% per annum. Events of default included, among other things,

 

(i)any default in the payment of (A) principal and interest payment under this Note or any other Indebtedness, or (B) Late Fees, liquidated damages and other amounts owing to the Holder of this Note, as and when the same shall become due and payable (whether on a Conversion Date, or the Maturity Date, or by acceleration or otherwise), which default, solely in the case of a default under clause (B) above, is not cured within five Trading Days;

 

  (ii) the Company or any Subsidiary shall be subject to a Bankruptcy Event;

F-17

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

  (iii) the SEC suspends the Common Stock from trading or the Company’s Common Stock is not listed or quoted for trading on a Trading Market which failure is not cured, if possible to cure, within the earlier to occur of 10 Trading Days after notice of such failure is sent by the Holder or by any other Holder to the Company or the transfer of shares of Common Stock through the Depository Trust Company System is no longer available or is subject to a “chill” by the Depository Trust Company or any successor;

 

  (iv) the Company shall be a party to any Change of Control Transaction or shall agree to sell or dispose of all or in excess of 50% of its assets in one transaction or a series of related transactions (whether or not such sale would constitute a Change of Control Transaction);

 

  (v) the Company incurs any Indebtedness other than Permitted Indebtedness;

 

  (vi) the Company restates any financial statements included in its reports or registration statements filed pursuant to the Securities Act or the Exchange Act for any date or period from two years prior to the Original Issue Date of this Note and until this Note is or the Warrants issued to the Holder are no longer outstanding, if following first public announcement or disclosure that a restatement will occur the VWAP on the next Trading Day is 20% less than the VWAP on the prior Trading Day. For the purposes of this clause the next Trading Day if an announcement is made before 4:00 pm New York, NY time is either the day of the announcement or the following Trading Day. The Company filed a Report on Form 8-K announcing the restatement of its financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2020. Following the first public announcement or disclosure that a restatement occurred, the VWAP on the next Trading Day was not 20% less than the VWAP on the prior Trading Day and accordingly, the default provisions were not triggered.

 

The Company has also granted the investor a 12-month (or until the Notes are no longer outstanding) right to participate in specified future financings, up to a level of 30%.

 

In connection with the SPA, on October 18, 2021, the Company issued 668,151 shares of its common stock to the placement agent as fee for the capital raise. The 668,151 shares of common stock issued were recorded as a debt discount of $14,064 based on the relative fair value method to be amortized over the life of the Note. The 16,500,000 Initial Warrants were valued at $347,142 using the relative fair value method and recorded as a debt discount to be amortized over the life of the note. The original issue discounts of $75,000, placement fees of $60,000, and legal fees of $10,000, aggregating $145,000, was recorded as a debt discount to be amortized into interest expense over the twelve-month term of the note. Additionally, the Initial Note was convertible into common shares at an initial conversion price of is $0.025 which was lower than the fair value of common shares based on the quoted closing price of the Company’s common stock on the measurement date. Since warrants and common shares were issued with the Initial Note, the proceeds were allocated to the instrument based on relative fair value. The Initial Warrants did not contain any features requiring liability treatment and therefore were classified as equity. The value allocated to the Initial Warrants and common shares issued was $347,142 and $14,064, respectively, and $318,794 was allocated to the beneficial conversion feature. Since the intrinsic value of the beneficial conversion feature, warrants and common shares was greater than the proceeds allocated to the convertible instrument, the amount of the discount assigned to the beneficial conversion feature, warrants and common shares issued was limited to the amount of the proceeds allocated to the convertible instrument. Accordingly, the Company recorded an aggregate non-cash debt discount of $680,000 with the credit to additional paid in capital. This debt discount was amortized to interest expense over the term of the Convertible Note through the date Exchange Agreement discussed below.

 

On April 20, 2022, the Company and the Investor entered into an Exchange Agreement (the “Exchange Agreement”). The original SPA remains in effect. Per the terms of the Exchange Agreement, the Parties agreed to exchange (i) the Initial Note for a new Convertible Promissory Note (the “New Note”) and (ii) the Initial Warrant for a new five-year warrant to purchase, in the aggregate, 33,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.025 per share (the “New Warrant” and together with the New Note, the “New Securities”), according to the terms and conditions of the Exchange Agreement. On April 20, 2022, pursuant to the terms of the Exchange Agreement, the Investor surrendered the Prior Securities in exchange for the New Securities. Other than the surrender of the Prior Securities, no consideration of any kind whatsoever was given by the Investor to the Company in connection with the Exchange Agreement. The terms of the New Securities are the same as the Prior Securities except for the pricing of the shares issuable under the New Note and the shares issuable upon exercise of the New Warrant. The New Securities are composed of the New Note, which is a 10% Original Issue Discount Senior Convertible Promissory Note in the principal amount of $825,000, and the New Warrant. The New Note matured on October 15, 2022, bore interest at a rate of 4% per annum through the date of default, and was initially convertible into the Company’s common stock at a fixed conversion price of $0.0125 per share, subject to adjustment for stock splits, stock combinations, dilutive issuances, and similar events, as described in the New Note. If the average Closing Price during any 10 consecutive Trading Day period beginning and ending during the 60 Day Effectiveness Period (the “Average Closing Price”) is below the Conversion Price than the conversion price will be reduced to such Average Closing Price but in no event less than $0.00875.

 

On October 15, 2022, the due date of the New Note, the New Note defaulted due to non-payment. Accordingly, the Company added a default penalty of $206,250, or 25%, to the principal balance and recorded interest expense of $206,250, and interest shall accrue at 18% per annum.

 

In accordance with ASC 470-50, Debt Modifications and Extinguishments, the Company performed an assessment of whether the Exchange Agreement transaction was deemed to be new debt, a modification of existing debt, or an extinguishment of existing debt. The Company evaluated the April 20, 2022 Exchange Agreement for debt modification and concluded that the debt qualified for debt extinguishment. On April 20, 2022, the Company agreed to reduce the conversion price from $0.025 per share to $0.0125 per share, and to cancel the Initial Warrant to purchase 16,500,000 shares of common exercisable at $0.05 per shares, and to issue a New Warrant to purchase 33,000,000 shares exercisable at $0.025 per share. All other terms of the convertible note and warrants remain unchanged, and therefore did not change the cash flows of the note. The New Warrants did not contain any features requiring liability treatment and therefore were classified as equity.

F-18

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

The Company determined the transaction was considered a debt extinguishment because of the change in conversion price was substantial. Upon extinguishment, the Company had $395,313 of unamortized initial debt discount recorded which it wrote off, and the Company recorded a buyback of $160,993 which represents the reversal of calculated beneficial conversion feature on the initial debt upon settlement, for an aggregate net loss on debt extinguishment of $234,320. The Company recorded a new debt discount in connection with the New Note which was calculated based on the relative fair value of the New Warrants of $325,785. Additionally, the New Note is convertible into common shares at an initial conversion price of $0.0125 which was lower than the fair value of common shares based on the quoted closing price of the Company’s common stock on the measurement date. The value allocated to the New Warrants was $325,785, and $354,215 was allocated to the beneficial conversion feature. Since the intrinsic value of the beneficial conversion feature and warrants was greater than the proceeds allocated to the convertible instrument, the amount of the discount assigned to the beneficial conversion feature and warrants issued was limited to the amount of the proceeds allocated to the convertible instrument. Accordingly, the Company recorded an aggregate non-cash debt discount of $680,000 with the credit to additional paid in capital. This debt discount was amortized to interest expense over the remaining term of the Convertible Note.

 

The Company uses the Binomial Valuation Model to determine the fair value of its stock warrants which requires the Company to make several key judgments including:

 

  the value of the Company’s common stock;
     
  the expected life of issued stock warrants;
     
  the expected volatility of the Company’s stock price;
     
  the expected dividend yield to be realized over the life of the stock warrants; and
     
  the risk-free interest rate over the expected life of the stock warrants.

 

The Company’s computation of the expected life of issued stock warrants was based on the simplified method as the Company does not have adequate exercise experience to determine the expected term. The interest rate was based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant. The computation of volatility was based on the historical volatility of the Company’s common stock.

 

On October 18, 2021 and April 20, 2022 (the Exchange Agreement date) along with various re-pricings as outlined below, the fair value of the stock warrants were estimated at issuance using the Binomial Valuation Model with the following assumptions:

 

   2022  2021
Dividend rate  % 
—%
Term (in years)  4 years  5 years
Volatility  246.6% to 329.6%  348.5%
Risk—free interest rate  2.79% to 3.12%  1.16%

 

At any time this Note or any amounts accrued and payable thereunder remain outstanding, the Company or any Subsidiary, as applicable, sells or grants any option to purchase or sells or grants any right to reprice, or otherwise disposes of or issues (or announces any sale, grant or any option to purchase or other disposition), any common stock or common stock equivalents entitling any Person to acquire shares of the Company’s common stock at an effective price per share that is lower than the conversion price then in effect (such lower price, the “Base Conversion Price” and each such issuance or announcement a “Dilutive Issuance”), then the conversion price shall be immediately reduced to equal the Base Conversion Price. Such adjustment shall be made whenever such common stock or common stock equivalents are issued. On June 23, 2022, the Company issued common stock equivalents with an initial conversion price of $0.011 per share and accordingly, the conversion price and warrant down-round provisions were triggered. As a result, the conversion price of the New April 2022 Note was reduced to $0.011 per share and the exercise price of the New April 2022 Warrant was lowered to $0.011. As a result of the June 23, 2022 down-round provisions, the Company calculated the difference between the warrants fair value on June 23, 2022, the date the down-round feature was triggered using the then current exercise price of $0.025 and the new exercise price of $0.011. On June 23, 2022, the Company recorded a deemed dividend of $3,702 which represents the fair value transferred to the warrant holders from the down round feature being triggered. No additional beneficial conversion feature amount was recorded based on the June 23, 2022 valuation as the ratcheted beneficial conversion feature value was lower than the original amount. Additionally, on September 6, 2022, the Company issued common stock equivalents with an initial conversion price of $0.009 per share and accordingly, the conversion price and warrant down-round provisions were triggered. As a result, the conversion price of the New April 2022 Note was reduced to $0.009 per share and the exercise price of the New April 2022 Warrant was lowered to $0.009. As a result of the September 6, 2022 down-round provisions, the Company calculated the difference between the warrants fair value on September 6, 2022, the date the down-round feature was triggered using the then current exercise price of $0.011 and the new exercise price of $0.009. On September 6, 2022, the Company recorded a deemed dividend of $733 which represents the fair value transferred to the warrant holders from the down round feature being triggered. No additional beneficial conversion feature amount was recorded based on the September 6, 2022 valuation as the ratcheted beneficial conversion feature value was lower than the original amount.

 

F-19

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

Pursuant to the provisions of ASC 815-40 – Derivatives and Hedging – Contracts in an Entity’s Own Stock, the convertible note and related warrants issued in connection with the Mercer convertible note was analyzed and it was determined that the terms of the convertible note and warrants contained terms that were not considered derivatives.

 

1800 Diagonal Lending Convertible Debt

 

On November 9, 2022, the Company closed a Securities Purchase Agreement dated November 4, 2022, with 1800 DIAGONAL LENDING LLC, a Virginia limited liability company, (“Diagonal”), pursuant to which a Promissory Note (the “November 2022 Diagonal Note”) dated November 4, 2022, was made to Diagonal in the aggregate principal amount of $104,250 and the Company received net proceeds of $100,000 which was net of fees of $4,250. The November 2022 Diagonal Note bears interest at a rate of 12% per annum (22% upon the occurrence of an event of a default) and all outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest are due on May 4, 2024.

 

On December 27, 2022, the Company closed a Securities Purchase Agreement dated December 27, 2022, with 1800 Diagonal pursuant to which a Promissory Note (“December 2022 Diagonal Note”) dated December 27, 2022, was made to Diagonal in the aggregate principal amount of $64,250 and the Company received net proceeds of $60,000 which was net of fees of $4,250. The December 2022 Diagonal Note bears interest at a rate of 12% per annum (22% upon the occurrence of an event of a default) and all outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest are due on June 27, 2024.

 

The Company has the right to prepay the November 2022 and December 2022 Diagonal Notes (principal and accrued interest) at any time during the first six months the note is outstanding at the rate of 115% during the first 30 days after issuance, 120% during the 31st to 60th day after issuance, and 125% during the 61st to the 180th day after issuance. The November 2022 and December 2022 Diagonal Notes may not be prepaid after the 180th day following the issuance date, unless Diagonal agrees to such repayment and such terms. Diagonal may in its option, at any time beginning 180 days after the date of the Diagonal Notes, convert the outstanding principal and interest on the November 2022 and December 2022 Diagonal Notes into shares of our common stock at a conversion price per share equal to 65% of the average of the three lowest closing bid prices of our common stock during the 10 trading days prior to the date of conversion. At no time may the November 2022 and December 2022 Diagonal Notes be converted into shares of our common stock if such conversion would result in Diagonal and its affiliates owning an aggregate of in excess of 4.99% of the then outstanding shares of our common stock.

 

The Company has accounted for the November 2022 and December 2022 Diagonal Notes as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and recorded an aggregate debt premium of $90,731 with a charge to interest expense.

 

For the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, amortization of debt discounts related to the convertible notes payable amounted to $938,344 and $171,875, respectively, which has been included in interest expense on the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.

 

On December 31, 2022 and 2021, accrued interest payable under the convertible notes discussed above amounted to $83,138 and $7,052, respectively, and is included in accrued expenses on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

 

On December 31, 2022 and 2021, convertible notes payable consisted of the following:

 

   December 31,
2022
   December 31,
2021
 
Convertible notes payable  $1,199,750   $825,000 
Add: put premium   90,731    
-
 
Less: unamortized debt discount   (7,968)   (653,125)
Convertible note payable, net   1,282,513    171,875 
Less: current portion of convertible note payable   (1,031,250)   (171,875)
Convertible note payable – long-term  $251,263   $
-
 

 

F-20

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

NOTE 9 – NOTES PAYABLE

 

On December 31, 2022 and 2021, notes payable consisted of the following:

 

   December 31,
2022
   December 31,
2021
 
Notes payable  $1,899,380   $978,925 
Note payable – PPP note   18,823    48,929 
Total notes payable   1,918,203    1,027,854 
Less: unamortized debt discount   (132,961)   
-
 
Note payable, net   1,785,242    1,027,854 
Less: current portion of notes payable, net of discount   (1,576,438)   (488,414)
Notes payable – long-term  $208,804   $539,440 

 

Notes Payable

 

BOCO Investment Note

 

On November 14, 2018, the Company entered into a Revolving Credit Facility Loan and Security Agreement (“Loan Agreement”) and a Secured Promissory Note (the “Note”) with BOCO Investments, LLC (the “Lender”). Subject to and in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Loan Agreement and the Note, the Lender agreed to lend to the Company up to $400,000 (the “Maximum Loan Amount”) against the issuance and delivery by the Company of the Note for use as working capital and to assist in inventory acquisition. In 2018, the Lender loaned $400,000 to the Company, the Maximum Loan Amount. The Company should have repaid all principal, interest and other amounts outstanding on or before November 14, 2020. The Company’s obligations under the Loan Agreement and the Note are secured by a first-priority security interest in substantially all the Company’s assets (the “Collateral”). The outstanding principal advanced to Company pursuant to the Loan Agreement initially bore interest at the rate of 12% per annum, compounded annually. Upon the occurrence of an Event of Default under the Loan Agreement and Note, all amounts then outstanding (including principal and interest) shall bear interest at the rate of 18% per annum, compounded annually until the Event of Default is cured. Additionally, at or prior to December 31, 2018, the Company should have achieved an accounts receivable balance plus inventory equal to the unpaid principal balance of the Note (the “Minimum Asset Amount”).

 

In the event that the Company’s accounts receivable balance plus inventory balance is less than paid principal balance of the Note as of December 31, 2018, the Company shall have 45 days (through and until February 15, 2019) to cure such violation and an establish accounts receivable plus inventory equal to the unpaid principal balance of the Note. Commencing March 31, 2019 and at all times thereafter through the remainder of the commitment period and for so long thereafter as there is any amount still due and owing under the Note, the Company must maintain an accounts receivable balances plus inventory such that the outstanding principal borrowed by Company under the Loan Agreement and Note is less than or equal to eighty five percent (85%) of accounts receivable plus fifty percent (50%) of inventory, all as measured at the same point in time.

 

Commencing on January 10, 2019 and on or before the 10th day of each month thereafter, the Company should have paid Lender all interest accrued on outstanding principal under the Loan Agreement and Notes as of the end of the month then concluded. Upon the occurrence of any Event of Default and at any time thereafter, Lender may, at its option, declare any and all obligations immediately due and payable without demand or notice. As of December 31, 2022 and 2021, the Company did not meet the Minimum Asset Amount covenant as defined in the Loan Agreement, failed to timely pay interest payments due, and has violated other default provisions. The note balance due of $400,000 has been reflected as a current liability on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and interest shall accrue at 18% per annum. The Loan Agreement and Note contain customary representations, warranties, and covenants, including certain restrictions on the Company’s ability to incur additional debt or create liens on its property. The Loan Agreement and the Note also provide for certain events of default, including, among other things, payment defaults, breaches of representations and warranties, breach of covenants, and bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, the occurrence of which, after any applicable cure period, would permit Lender, among other things, to accelerate payment of all amounts outstanding under the Loan Agreement and the Note, as applicable, and to exercise its remedies with respect to the Collateral, including the sale of the Collateral. On December 31, 2022 and 2021, principal amount due under this Note amounted to $400,000 and is considered to be in default. On December 31, 2022 and 2021, accrued interest payable under this Note amounted to $292,241 and $220,241, respectively, and is included in accrued expenses on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

 

F-21

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund Notes

 

On March 14, 2022, the Company entered into an Original Issue Discount Promissory Note and Security Agreement (the “March 2022 Note”) in the principal amount of $197,500 with Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (the “Investor”). The March 2022 Note was funded on March 14, 2022 and the Company received net proceeds of $175,000 which is net of an original issue discount and investor legal fees of $22,500. The original issue discount was recorded as a debt discount to be amortized over the life of the March 2022 note. The March 2022 Note matures 12 months after issuance and bears interest at a rate of 3% per annum. At any time, the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount of the March 2022 Note and any accrued and unpaid interest without penalty. The March 2022 Note also creates a lien on and grants a priority security interest in all the Company’s assets. In connection with the March 2022 Note, the Company issued 823,529 shares of its common stock to the placement agent as fee for the capital raise. The 823,529 shares of common stock issued were recorded as a debt discount of $12,963 based on the relative fair value method to be amortized over the life of the March 2022 Note. For the year ended December 31, 2022, amortization of debt discount related to the March 2022 Note amounted to $28,075 which has been included in interest expense on the accompanying consolidated statements of operations. On December 31, 2022, the principal balance due on the March 2022 Note amounted to $197,500 and accrued interest payable amounted to $4,756.

 

On November 22, 2022, the Company entered into a Promissory Note and Security Agreement (the “November 2022 Note”) in the principal amount of $65,000 with Mercer Street Global Opportunity Fund, LLC (the “Investor”). The November 2022 Note was funded on November 22, 2022 and the Company received net proceeds of $62,500 which is net of investor legal fees of $2,500. The legal fees were recorded as a debt discount to be amortized over the life of the November 2022 note. The November 2022 Note matures on August 22, 2023 and bears interest at a rate of 8% per annum. At any time, the Company may prepay all or any portion of the principal amount of the November 2022 Note and any accrued and unpaid interest without penalty. The November 2022 Note also creates a lien on and grants a priority security interest in all the Company’s assets. For the year ended December 31, 2022, amortization of debt discount related to the November 2022 Note amounted to $347 which has been included in interest expense on the accompanying consolidated statements of operations. On December 31, 2022, the principal balance due on the November 2022 Note amounted to $65,000 and accrued interest payable amounted to $214.

 

GS Capital Debt

 

On June 23, 2022, the Company entered into entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement (“Agreement”) with GS Capital Partners, LLC (“GS Capital”), pursuant to which a Promissory Note (the “GS Capital June 2022 Note”) was made to GS Capital in the aggregate principal amount of $195,000. The GS Capital June 2022 Note was purchased for $176,000, reflecting an original issuance discount of $19,000, and was funded on June 24, 2022 (less legal and other administrative fees). The Company received net proceeds of $148,420. The Company further issued GS Capital a total of 1,750,000 commitment shares (“Commitment Shares”) as additional consideration for the purchase of the Note (See Note 9). Additionally, the GS Capital Note is convertible upon an event of default into common shares at an initial effective conversion price which was lower than the fair value of common shares based on the quoted closing price of the Company’s common stock on the measurement date. Principal and interest payments shall be made in 10 installments of $21,060 each beginning on the 90th-day anniversary following the issue date and continuing thereafter each 30 days for nine months. The GS Capital Note matures 12 months after issuance and bears interest at a rate of 8% per annum. GS Capital shall have the right at any time following an Event of Default to convert all or any part of the outstanding and unpaid principal, interest, penalties, and all other amounts under this Note at a conversion price of $0.011, subject to adjustment as defined in the GS Capital Note. The Company did not calculate a beneficial conversion feature since the GS Capital Note is contingently convertible upon default on the GS Capital Note. As of December 31, 2022, the Company is not in default on this note. In the event that following the Issue Date the closing trading price of the Company’s common stock is then being traded is below $0.011 per share for more than ten consecutive trading days, then the conversion price shall be equal to $0.004 per share. The GS Capital Note contains conversion limitations providing that a holder thereof may not convert the Note to the extent (but only to the extent) that, if after giving effect to such conversion, the holder or any of its affiliates would beneficially own in excess of 4.99% of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock immediately after giving effect to such conversion or exercise. A holder may increase or decrease its beneficial ownership limitation upon notice to the Company provided that in no event such limitation exceeds 9.99%, and that any increase shall not be effective until the 61st day after such notice. Events of default include, amongst other items, failure to pay principal or interest, bankruptcy, delisting of the Company’s stock, financial statement restatements, or if the Company effectuates a reverse split. Upon the occurrence of any event of default, the GS Capital Note shall become immediately and automatically due and payable and the Company shall pay to GS Capital, in full satisfaction of its obligations hereunder, an amount equal to: (a) the then outstanding principal amount of this note plus (b) accrued and unpaid interest on the unpaid principal amount of this note to the date of payment (the “mandatory prepayment date”) plus (y) default interest, if any, multiplied by 120%. On December 15, 2022, the Company and GS Capital entered into a letter agreement to extend the due date of the GS Capital June 2022 note by 60 days. Specifically, the maturity date of the GS Capital June 2022 note was extended to August 23, 2023 and the next payment due date was extended to February 28, 2023. Through December 31, 2022, the Company paid $53,512 of principal balance. On December 31, 2022, the principal balance due on the GS Capital Note amounted to $141,488 and accrued interest payable amounted to $7,471.

 

F-22

 

 

C-BOND SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2022 and 2021

 

On July 26, 2022, the Company closed a Securities Purchase Agreement (“July 2022 Agreement”) with GS Capital, pursuant to which a Promissory Note (“GS Capital July 2022 Note”) was made to GS Capital in the aggregate principal amount of $195,000. The GS Capital July 2022 Note was purchased for $176,000, reflecting an original issuance discount of $19,000, and was funded on July 28, 2022 (less legal and other administrative fees). The Company received net proceeds of $158,920. The Company further issued GS Capital a total of 2,600,000 commitment shares (“July 2022 Commitment Shares”) as additional consideration for the purchase of the July 2022 Note. In addition, the Company issued 998,008 of its common stock to the placement agent as fee for the capital raise, respectively. The July Commitment Shares and the placement agent shares were recorded as a debt discount of $34,606 based on the relative fair value method to be amortized over the life of the Note. Additionally, the GS Capital July 2022 Note is convertible upon an event of default into common shares at an initial effective conversion price which was lower than the fair value of common shares based on the quoted closing price of the Company’s common stock on the measurement date. Principal and interest payments shall be made in 10 installments of $21,060 each beginning on the 90th-day anniversary following the issue date and continuing thereafter each 30 days for nine months. The GS Capital July 2022 Note matures 12 months after issuance and bears interest at a rate of 8% per annum. GS Capital shall have the right at any time following an Event of Default to convert all or any part of the outstanding and unpaid principal, interest, penalties, and all other amounts under the GS Capital July 2022 Note at a conversion price of $0.011, subject to adjustment as defined in the Note. The Company did not calculate a beneficial conversion feature since the GS Capital July 2022 Note is contingently convertible upon a default on the July 2022 Note. As of December 31, 2022, the Company is not in default on this note. In the event that following the Issue Date the closing trading price of the Company’s common stock is then being traded is below $0.011 per share for more than ten consecutive trading days, then the conversion price shall be equal to $0.004 per share. The July 2022 Note contains conversion limitations providing that a holder thereof may not convert the Note to the extent (but only to the extent) that, if after giving effect to such conversion, the holder or any of its affiliates would beneficially own in excess of 4.99% of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock immediately after giving effect to such conversion or exercise. A holder may increase or decrease its beneficial ownership limitation upon notice to the Company provided that in no event such limitation exceeds 9.99%, and that any increase shall not be effective until the 61st day after such notice. On December 15, 2022, the Company and GS Capital entered into a letter agreement to extend the due date of the GS Capital July 2022 note by 60 days. Specifically, the maturity date of the GS Capital July 2022 note was extended to September 26, 2023 and the next payment due date was extended to February 28, 2023. Through December 31, 2022, the Company paid $34,120 of principal balance. On December 31, 2022, the principal balance due on the GS Capital July 2022 Note amounted to $160,880 and accrued interest payable amounted to $6,441.

 

On September 6, 2022, the Company closed a Securities Purchase Agreement (“September 2022 Agreement”) with GS Capital, pursuant to which a Promissory Note (“September 2022 Note”) was made to GS Capital in the aggregate principal amount of $195,000. The September 2022 Note was purchased for $176,000, reflecting an original issuance discount of $19,000, and was funded on September 6, 2022 (less legal and other administrative fees). The Company received net proceeds of $158,920. The Company further issued GS Capital a total of